Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report
Dec 10 – 16, 2012

WEATHER: It has been a strange week for us on the weather front as we started the week with a bit of high cloud cover then went into a period of sunny skies for a few days. After enjoying the sun it appeared that we had just been teased as the clouds moved in on Thursday morning. The rain began and it was on and off all day and night with an eventual dump of about 1 inch total. We expected the clouds to move away then but upon looking at the animated shots could see that this may last at least through the weekend, and perhaps even longer. I don’t know if I should call this a “pineapple express” or not as it is coming at us from at least 800 miles south of Hawaii. There is a frontal system to the north of us that is preventing this system from going further north, if it lets up perhaps our skies will clear. Looking over my reports for the past 10 years we normally get this type of weather at the beginning of the year, and it is short lived giving us a little rain every week for about three weeks. One thing this has done for us is wash off all the trees and plants, giving back that green look, and of course it will help everything continue to grow. I just hope that since the weather is cooler with our lows in the high 60’s that the mosquitoes and flies will not be as prevalent. Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80’s.
WATER: Once again due to the cloud cover there were no good shots of the surface temperature, but from what we could see and what was reported by the boats it appears as if the water temperature across the area has dropped another degree or two. On both the Cortez and on the Pacific side of the cape we had inshore water at 75 to 76 degrees while just offshore on the Cortez side it warmed to 79 degrees and on the Pacific side to 78 degrees. With the rain came murky inshore water and the off-color conditions extended out for about ½ mile around all areas where arroyos entered the ocean. The cloud cover was moving in from the southwest but the surface winds were from the north, and with the north wind came choppy sea conditions on the Pacific side. Swells from the southwest collided with the wind from the north and it was a bit uncomfortable, at least on Thursday and Friday. By Saturday the winds had died off and the water settled down. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water was very nice with small swells at 1-3 feet, and if you were within 10 miles of shore the wind had little effect on you.
BAIT: There were bigger live baits such as Caballito (goggle-eye scad), some Mackerel (pacific greenback mackerel), Lisa (yellowtail mullet) and a few mixed baits available at the usual $3 each. Frozen horse-ballyhoo were available as well at $3 each and if you went north in the morning with plans to fish in the Punta Gorda area there were some Sardina available as well if you were there early, at the usual $25 a scoop.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: Not surprisingly there are fewer and fewer Blue and Black Marlin reported as the water cools off, but I know of at least one boat that caught and released a Blue Marlin they estimated at #250, and this was reported by experienced anglers. The fish was found inside the 95 spot to 1150 line, an area this boat fished heavily for several days. The Striped Marlin bite continued to pick up, and we do expect the action on these guys to improve on a steady basis. Drifting the high spots along the shore on the Pacific side with live bait dropped deep is still the most constant producer, but more and more fish are being found on the surface. As the cool water continues to wrap around the Cape from the Pacific side the Striped Marlin are following, and the fishing is improving on a daily basis on the Cortez side of the Cape. This was nice to have happen this week as conditions on the Pacific side were a bit bumpy. I think that perhaps 75% of the boats that went out this week were able to hook into a Striped Marlin. Unfortunately there are still many of these fish being killed by the crews, even though the anglers want to release the fish. I keep seeing the buckets going up the docks with a Marlin folded into it and no longer wonder why so many boats refuse to use circle hooks, I know that the crews want to keep the fish, sigh.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: Perhaps we will not see good Tuna action in our area until the beginning of the year, but there are still some cows being caught on the Gorda Banks every day. The fish have been under some heavy pressure but they are there, it is just a matter of spending the time, waiting them out, waiting for the bite to happen. Most of the action has been on chunk baits with hooks tied directly to the main line, and the fish are running between 150 and 250 pounds. Elsewhere the porpoise pods continue to be a hit-or-miss experience, with the first boats that find pods holding fish managing to get two or three in the 25 to 75 pound class and boats showing up a bit later just getting practice at trolling lures or soaking bait. I heard from a couple of private boats that there is an on-off bite on fish averaging 25 pound on the high points off of Punta Gordo, but they are getting there before sunrise to get into the bite, shortly after sunrise the local fleet pangas out of San Jose show up and the bite quickly drops off. Porpoise have been found from 5 miles due south to all along the 1,000 fathom line, so you never know when or where they may appear, you just have to keep your fingers crossed that the ones you come across hold tuna. The larger fish have been caught on live bait while lures, especially cedar plugs and dark colored feathers have been the best producers on the medium and smaller fish mixed with porpoise.

DORADO: Dorado action continued, but at a reduced pace as the water continues to cool. Most of the action has been found within 5 miles of the beach on the Pacific side, and while there are fewer numbers, the size continues to improve. Many of the fish being found are in the 20-25 pound class, and most of these fish are being found under feeding Frigate birds, and caught on live bait tossed out directly under the birds. You have to be careful though, because these birds are also a good indicator of feeding Striped Marlin, and it has not been uncommon for a couple of baits tossed out to be inhaled by a pair of Marlin! My guess is that about 75% of the boats are coming in with Dorado these days, but only 20% of them are coming in with limits, compared with 60% coming in with limits two weeks ago. The Cortez side is now producing more Dorado as the warmer water is now in this area and the Pacific side is cooling off, so look for the bite to slowly move from the Pacific side to the Cortez side over the next few week.
WAHOO: As always, a hit or miss fishery is the best way to describe the Wahoo bite. Mostly this week it has been a miss, but there are a few boats that are having fairly regular action of fish ranging from 20 to 35 pounds, as well as a few fish that are only as big as Sierra. Trolling lipped plugs like Rapallas, or swimming plugs like Marauders has been the best method of getting a Wahoo bite, but boats that are chunking or live baiting are getting bit as well, it’s just that most of these bites are cutting the leader!
INSHORE: The inshore bite has not changed from last weeks report with the exception of the fact that at the end of the week the areas around the arroyos have had dirty water due to the rain run-off. More and more Sierra are beginning to show up locally and while small at 3-5 pounds they have been biting when the schools have been found. Add in a few early Yellowtail to 20 pounds, a few red Snapper to 15 pounds and a few grouper to 20 pounds and the traditional inshore fishery is beginning to shape up nicely. Still, most of the Pangas are fishing slightly farther off the beach, taking advantage of the continued Dorado bite and the close proximity of Striped Marlin.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
NOTES: We are seeing more and more whales showing up, both Humpbacks offshore and Gray Whales along the beach. Christmas is usually the start of the season for these guys (actually girls) to show up and they are not disappointing us this year. Just before the holidays is normally a slow time for tourism as family are staying home in celebration, but as soon as Christmas is over we expect to be very busy again, and hopefully the fishing continues to improve! My music choice for this week was the CD “Underground Whispers” by violinist Alex DePue and guitarist Miguel De Hoyas. I listened to this one again as Miguel was playing in Las Riberras this weekend and we wanted to go listen, but all the hotels and motels were sold out due to an off-road race taking place. I had to listen to the CD instead, sigh. Until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

IMG00076-20121009-1357.jpg

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report
Dec 3-9, 2012

WEATHER: The air continues to get cooler every week, but I still don’t think we are going to have a white Christmas in Cabo! This week on the way to the Golf Course I read a chilly 65 degrees, but it did warm up later on to 81 degrees. Our average early morning has been right around 71 degrees, down a bit from last week. The week started out with sunny skies and slowly the clouds moved in, and with the clouds came some wind. The wind really picked up on the Pacific side on Friday, building up some nice whitecaps and rollers making it very uncomfortable to fish, but that was the introduction to the cloud deck that hovered over us on Saturday. On Saturday the clouds settled in and the wind died down.
WATER: Due to the cloud cover there were no good shots of the surface temperature, but from what we could see and what was reported by the boats it appears as if the water temperature across the area has dropped a degree or two. On both the Cortez and on the Pacific side of the cape we had inshore water at 77 to 78 degrees while just offshore on the Cortez side it warmed to 81 degrees and on the Pacific side to 80 degrees. On the Pacific side the water became a bit off-colored, not as clear as we had been getting the past several months. Due to the wind at the end of the week we did have several days when the Pacific side became very choppy, on the Cortez side the swells were small and the wind just created a small chop. Farther up the coast on the Cortez side, up past Punta Gordo the water conditions again became a bit rough due to the wind.
BAIT: No change in the bait availability this week from last week. There was plenty of Caballito, a few Mackerel and a very limited supply of Sardina. The bigger baits were the usual $3 each while the Sardinas, if you could find a boat with some to sell, were going for $25 a scoop.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: As the water cools down the number of Striped Marlin that are being seen and are being caught continues to increase, and the number of Blue and Black Marlin caught decreases. As a matter of fact, I only heard of one Blue Marlin being caught this week, a small fish of about 200 pounds caught on the Cortez side out around the 1150 area. The Striped Marlin are another story though. It appeared that if you really wanted to catch a Striped Marlin all you had to do was wait. The fish were stacked up on the Lighthouse ledge, San Cristobal point and a few were on the Golden Gate bank again this week. Along with dropping bait down and drifting for them in these areas, boats were seeing more and more tailing fish on the surface, and getting more fish coming into the pattern when trolling lures. Over all though, the best method continued to be dropping live bait down 100 to 200 feet and waiting for a bite. As I mentioned last week, this is not my favorite method, but it sure does work. Trolling rigged Ballyhoo was also a great producer as long as there were fish in the area you were working. There are still a few Sailfish around to go with the Marlin, but not in any great numbers. The Striped Marlin have been ranging in size from 50 pound little guys to 180 pound fish with the average right around 110 pounds.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: There is still a lack of schooling Tuna in our area, even though once in a while a boat will find porpoise with Tuna on them. One of our clients this week was trying to get a Marlin on his Fly Rod and while looking for the right fish they found a pod of Porpoise that held tuna. When getting one to strike the fly proved unsuccessful they put out a live bait and brought in a nice 70 pound fish. Other boats soon arrived and for a little while there was some action. This has been the situation this week, at least to the south and the west. For boats going up to the Cortez side and working the Gordo Banks, there are still some nice big cows being caught, but as always, you really have to put in the time and effort to get one of them. Chunking with Bonito and Skipjack while chumming with Sardinas has been the preferred method for these freight train tuna. Farther up the coast there is still some action happening on the high spots as long as the wind is not blowing. There were a couple of really good days this week according to boats that made the run from here, but the earlier you arrived the better, and boats fishing out of San Jose did much better than boats out of Cabo as it is at least an hour closer for them.

DORADO: The Dorado action dropped off quite a bit this week, probably due to the cooler water as the fish move and follow the warmer temperatures. Not that there were no fish, there just were not the numbers or concentrations we were seeing several weeks ago. As an example, boats fishing short trips close to home had a difficult time getting limits this week. It took a concentrated effort and a full day working the shoreline between Cabo and Todo Santos for one of our clients to come in with 9 very nice fish. Hard work as he said and the fish were scattered. It was steady action all day long with the largest fish going 35 pounds, several in the 25 pound range and the rest between 12 and 18 pounds. Slow trolling Ballyhoo in an area where a fish had been hooked up sometimes produced another fish, but the fish were not concentrated. The normal method of keeping a fish in the water as a decoy to bring in other fish in the school did not work well this week. Fishing Frigate birds was a good method, as always, of getting hooked up to a Dorado, but as the water cools the chances are just as good that the birds are working Striped Marlin as they are of the fish being a Dorado.
WAHOO: The Wahoo bite slowed down quite a bit this week as we are going into the new moon phase, but there were still a few fish caught and more lost. The action as always was just off the rocky points and drop-offs of fish that ranged from wee-hoo’s to 40 pound fish.
INSHORE: More and more Sierra are beginning to show up locally and while small at 3-5 pounds they have been biting when the schools have been found. Add in a few early Yellowtail to 20 pounds, a few red Snapper to 15 pounds and a few grouper to 20 pounds and the traditional inshore fishery is begining to shape up nicely. Still, most of the Pangas are fishing slightly farther off the beach, taking advantage of the continued Dorado bite and the close proximity of Striped Marlin.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
NOTES: Whale season in on its way, traditionally between Christmas and Easter, but there are a few showing up now. We finally got our Christmas tree up and have been watching specials on TV, getting into the spirit of Christmas. It’s sometimes hard to do when the weather doesn’t change! If you are thinking about coming to Cabo for a vacation and want to fish, check us out on our website, all we do is fishing, no tee-shirts sales, bait or gear, we concentrate on fishing!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Tippets Dorado on the fly!

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report
November 19 – 25, 2012

WEATHER: Once again the lowest I saw the temperature this week was 72 degrees, low enough that I felt a slight chill (yes, I have lived where it has been warm on purpose and maybe my blood is a bit thin, lol!). With daytime highs in the high 80’s it was a great week. We had mostly sunny skies and a bit of wind from the north on most days, once in a while shifting and coming at us from the northeast or east for a few hours, then switching back. It’s not time for sweaters in the evening yet, and I am a bit surprised since looking back over the past 13 years worth of my reports it is normally five degrees cooler during this week.
WATER: The water across the region was 81-83 degrees this week and once again we had no major temperature breaks. The only anomaly we had was an 85 degree hot-spot appearing across the 1150 and 95 spot on the 25th. The water on the Pacific side developed just a tinge of green late in the week while on the Cortez side it remained clean and blue. The surface conditions on the Pacific side were a bit on the bouncy side early in the week as we did have a fairly steady breeze at 12 knots from the north, at least until the middle of the week, and combined with 3-5 foot swells (long period though, no real steep stuff) it was uncomfortable for some people. The winds died off later in the week and it was much more comfortable by the weekend. On the Cortez side it was comfortable as usual with small swells at 1-3 feet and little wind until you got 25 miles out or up past Punta Gorda a ways, then the effects of the northerly breeze began to be seen.
BAIT: There was plenty of Caballito, a few Mackerel and a very limited supply of Sardina this week. The bigger baits were the usual $3 each while the Sardinas, if you could find a boat with some to sell, were going for $25 a scoop.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: Our water has remained warm enough for there to still be some Blue and Black Marlin around, and anglers have lucked into a few of them this past week. I know of one Blue Marlin that was brought in and weighed that was 425 pounds, caught due south of us at 15 miles, there was also a Black Marlin estimated at 400 pounds caught up on the Gordo Bank. Smaller Blue Marlin were reported as well, no great numbers but enough of them that the possibility of catching one was better than most years at this time. The Striped Marlin action has picked up, and I expect it to continue to improve as the water keeps cooling down. Many boats are releasing two to four fish per day using several methods to hook the fish. Sight casting to Marlin seen tailing down swell has always been a favorite here, and done by an experienced crew can be a really beautiful thing to watch. Fortunately the fish were feeding in the feeding mood this week, a surprise since we are just coming off a full moon. The most common method used this week is one of my least favorites, but very productive in certain situations. Using live bait bridled to the hook with 12 feet of leader, the leader is attached to the main line and a 3 to 5 ounce torpedo sinker is attached to the main line just above the swivel. The rig is lowered to just off the bottom and drifted until a fish bites. This works very well when the fish are concentrated in a certain area and won’t come to the surface, or only come up in small flurries. The downside, and the reasons I don’t really care for it is that it is boring, with no action happening for a long time, and the fact that there is so much line out, and so many boats using “J” hooks that too many fish are gut hooked and killed. The use of circle hooks while fishing this way should be mandatory, in my opinion, but of course there would be no way to enforce it. It is effective though, and was used a lot this week at the ledge off the Pacific lighthouse, the point off of San Cristobal and on the Golden Gate Bank.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: The lack of consistent action on Yellowfin Tuna continues to amaze me, but as I look over the past years reports I noticed that the situation has been about the same every year, I am just getting antsy for the good action to happen! On a very positive note, there are still large Yellowfin Tuna being caught at the Gordo Banks, with several fish each day weighing over 100 pounds and an occasional fish over 200 pounds. The pressure on them has dropped off and I think that with enough time spent fishing for them there is a good possibility of hooking one of these larger Tuna. How much time would be needed is a gamble though, it could be an hour or it could be several days! Elsewhere, there have been football fish to 12 pounds caught all along the coastline on the Cortez side with most of the action concentrated on the northern inshore banks past Punta Gordo, but consistent (not red-hot) action has been found off of Palmilla, Chileno and Cabo Del Sol as well. The smaller fish have responded to chumming with Sardina (if you can get them) while the larger fish at the Gordo Banks have been biting on slow trolled live baits and drifted chunks. Offshore action on Yellowfin has been very spotty this week with only a few pods of porpoise holding fish. My records show that for the past 6 years this has been true, and the few offshore fish that have been caught have been found outside the 1,000 fathom line on the Cortez side or north of the Golden Gate Bank on the Pacific side.

DORADO: OK, Dorado have returned to the top of the list and regained their title of “Fish Of The Week”. While I would not say it is “red-hot” it is as good as I have seen in a long time, and as it is fairly late in the season most of the fish are good sized, averaging in the 12-15 pound class with quite a few fish pushing the 25-30 pound range. Many boats have been able to limit out on these nice eating fish fairly quickly in the morning, leaving them plenty of time to try for Marlin or Wahoo the rest of the trip. Of course as with all fishing, the fish are where you find them , and getting in the right area was a necessity for a good catch. Trolling lures at 8 to 9 knots until hooking up, then slow trolling live bait in that area was one way, and worked very well. Leaving the first fish hooked up in the water until more fish appeared is an old tried-and-true method that continues to produce great catches. The only downside of course is that your fish may come off while using it as a decoy! Great action can occur when frigate fishing. Trolling as normal while scanning the sky for working Frigate birds, then running over to where they are working and tossing out live bait is exciting and very productive. These birds are not out there for sport, and they have much better eyes than we do so using them as spotters makes all kind of sense. We had several clients who limited out on Dorado early in the day this week using this method. Remember, the limit on Dorado is two fish per day, per person. If the Captain and crew have licenses they can count in your catch as well!
WAHOO: This full moon phase has been great for Wahoo, not the day of the full moon but the days prior to and just after gave us steady action on Wahoo the ranged from 5 pounds (wee-hoo) to fish in the 40-50 pound class. Almost all the action occurred close to shore along the ledges, areas ranged from Vinorama on the Cortez side to Todo Santos on the Pacific side. Almost any point and any steep drop could hold these speedy fish. Fishing with Rapallas, Marauders, steel leader bullet head lures and rigged ballyhoo worked well. More fish were lost than caught since their razor-like teeth cut through mono leader easier than a hot knife through butter, but a lot of them were hooked in the corner of the jaw, that allowed anglers to get them to the boat. Not every boat caught these fish, but there were enough of them around that you had a decent chance.
INSHORE: As the water cools down we have had a slight improvement in the inshore fishery, but most of the Pangas are still targeting the Dorado and Striped Marlin just off the beach. Those that are working the beach areas are finding decent numbers of small Roosterfish (to 15 pounds), and occasional early Yellowtail and and few early Sierra. These Yellowtail and Sierra are small ones, and I am going to get out this coming week and try to catch a dozen of the small Sierra to freeze up for rigged Marlin bait for next year! There have been decent catches of Snapper and Grouper on the bottom and plenty of Needlefish and Bonito on the surface.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
NOTES: With Thanksgiving vacation over and Christmas yet to come, we are in a traditional slow time of year when it comes to the numbers of visitors we see. What this means for you is less pressure on the fish stocks and a better chance of hooking up! The weather is great, the fish are here, the whales are starting to appear and the golf courses are in great shape. Ready for a vacation? This weeks report was written to the music of Ernest Ranglin, if you like guitar, you have to listen to his version of “Stop That Train” from his album “Memories of Barber Mack”, a very infectious, toe tapping jazzy Jamaican instrumental! Until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report
November 19 – 25, 2012

WEATHER: I almost put on a heavy long-sleeved shirt yesterday morning as it was 68 degrees outside! That is the coldest I have seen it so far this season and it felt great. As the day went on it warmed to 88 degrees and if that’s not great weather, I don’t know what is! We had a few clouds over us early in the week but then it cleared and we have had blue skies from Tuesday on through the weekend. The winds have been variable with a few gusty days starting the week, but things leveled out into the normal days flow with calm mornings and breezy conditions starting about noon. Most of the wind has been from northerly directions.
WATER: There were no temperature breaks out there again, the water was a pretty even 81-84 degrees from up on the Pacific all the way to the East Cape, and it was clean, blue water as well. On the Pacific side the surface conditions were great in the mornings once we went past Tuesday, earlier in the week than that and it was a bit bumpy in the mornings due to the winds. The swells were coming in at 2-5 feet and spaced well apart, making it a smooth ride. On the Cortez side the winds were lighter and had little effect on the fishing between here and San Jose, I heard that the wind had more effect the farther up the coastline you went. The swells on this side of the Cape were small and insignificant at 1-3 feet.
BAIT: The water has cooled a few degrees, down from the 86 degree water we were seeing a month ago and as a result there are a few Mackerel showing up as bait. Buying Mackerel or Caballito from the bait boats sets you back about $3 per bait and there have been very few Sardines this week here, but there have been a limited availability if you travel north to San Jose.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: With the water still warm enough there are still Blue and Black Marlin around, but no large ones that I heard of, and no great numbers either. The best results I know of in the past week on these larger fish came from the Pacific side as one of our clients had a double hook-up on small Blue Marlin. He was fishing solo and one fish came off right away, the other was released at the side of the boat after about an hour of fighting time, with plenty of pictures as it was held in the water. The fish looked to be about 225 to 250 pounds. Other boats reported hooking one now and then with almost all of them released or lost, I only heard of one that was brought in. As far as the Striped Marlin go, things are starting to pick up. This is nice to hear since things have been a bit slow. The cooler water bringing in the Mackerel has the Striped Marlin following them, and as most of the bait has been deep, the best results on Striped Marlin have been had by boats that are hooking up live bait and dropping it down to where the bait is. The usual areas such as the ledge off of the lighthouse, the point at Los Arcos and the mouth of Migraino Canyon, areas where the bait tends to stack up, have played host to many of the local fleet boats giving this method a try. Some boats have been working on the Golden Gate Bank as this is often the first area within easy reach for the fleet that these fish stack up on. A few more boats have been traveling as far as 50 miles up the coastline to the Finger Banks in the hope of getting into these fish early, before the pressure intensifies. Many of these fish have been small, between 50 and 90 pounds, but there have been a few large ones of over 200 pounds caught as well. While the fishing is picking up, it is still not a wide open bite, perhaps that will happen withing the next several months as the water cools even more and the Mackerel appear in force. We are really hoping to see large numbers of big Sardines as well, that was the major feed when we had the great fishing several years ago. Folks, if you are going to be Marlin fishing, remember that catch and release will ensure we have these fish for our children to catch!
YELLOWFIN TUNA: The fantastic action that happened several weeks at the Gordo Banks continues to slow down. There were a few fish reported every day the week before last, this past week it was even slower with only a few large Tuna taken. Other than that, there were only a few reports of any Yellowfin being caught. One boat with our clients found a stump with the roots in the air about 25 miles out and caught a large number of football size tuna off of it, but the porpoise pods that have been found have been empty of fish life. Once in a while a Yellowfin has been caught by boats chumming heavily along the coast in front of the Cabo Del Sol area, but most of the fish coming in to these chum lines have been big Bonito.

DORADO: I wasn’t sure if I should call Dorado “fish of the week” again or not, since the bite dropped off, but they are still the most common catch. Again, most of the action has been on the Pacific side of the Cape and finding feeding Frigate Birds, being the first one there and slow trolling live bait has been the key to consistent catches. It’s either that, or trolling lures until you hook a fish then keeping him in the water as a decoy, dropping back live bait or cut strip baits to any fish that come in to follow him. Both methods worked well for boats that only wanted Dorado. Quite a few fish were caught by boats dropping bait for Striped Marlin, a nice break when the bite on the big fish was slow, and putting something in the boat that was good to eat.
WAHOO: As we approach the full moon the bite on Wahoo has improved a bit. I have heard reports from boats traveling to the Punta Gordo area and past there that they have been getting bit on a regular basis. Once that happened almost every one of them put out a trolling plug on wire leader and worked the area where they got bit. About half of them managed to get a fish in the boat. On the Pacific side the same thing has happened up the coastline toward Cerritos beach. There have been no big numbers of fish, there never are any great catches except by a few people who specialize in these speedsters, but the bite has improved, and hopefully they will remain around for the next month or so.
INSHORE: Inshore fishing remains slow with most boats working outside the beach area for Dorado. Those we have had out, mostly fly fishing, have reported occasional Dorado, small Roosterfish, plenty of Needle fish and green Jacks and loads of Bonito. Working the bottom has produced a few nice snapper and a couple of grouper as well.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
NOTES: Thanksgiving is over and we had a really great time with 30 people attending, lots of food and drink. The only downside was no football! Our TV system (at home)has been having problems for several months and we thought it was finally fixed as the TELMEX tech. Came Thanksgiving at noon, did a quick check and said he would be back in an hour after doing some switch work downtown to improve our service. 30 minutes later, no TV, no Phone Line, no Internet, nada. He finally returned the next day and we still have no TV, sigh. Everyone had a great time anyway, so all is good. Until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Dorado in Wine

Quick and simple, this recipe tastes great and can be ready in 15 minutes!

I like this on rice, so cook some first, you can do quick rice as well, but it does’nt taste quite as good.

2 Dorado filltes
1 1/2 cup white wine (better quality gives better results)
1 1/2 teaspoon capers
1 teaspoon diced onion
1 1/2 cup sour cream
2 teaspoons minced chives

Put the wine in a saucepan with the capers and diced onion, heat so it starts to bubble.
Place the fillets in and poach until 3/4 done, still a bit pink when looking at the ends, remove from the pan.
Reduce the wine to 3/4 volume, add the sour cream and reduce to 1/2 volume.
Replace fillets in the pan with the sauce, continue to cook several more minutes until almost done.
Remove filltes, place on top of rice, spoon sauce on top and sprinkle with chives.
Serve with a small green salad and a glass of the remaining white wine (told you the good stuff was better!).

Bisbee’s Black and Blue Tournament

Wow it was a very excitinig day over by the weight station. Not because of big fish. I just think everyone was so happy it’s “That time of Year”. Pretty much the start of our tourist season. Of course beads were flyng everywhere. There was lots of people looking for a good time as it always is around the weight station for Bisbee’s Black and Blue.

The fishing for that big blue marlin proved illusive. There was one marlin brought to the dock early in the day, but it was underweight. At least that fish went to a good cause.
There were lots of fish out there, but the only to bite did not meet the 300 lb minimum.
There was 1 black marlin, 7 blue marlin, 19 striped marlin, 2 sailfish and 1 spearfish released yesterday. One blue marline brought to the weigh station. The spearfish and sailfish do not count towards release category totals.
What is a spearfish I know many of you are asking. Here is the IGFA link.

http://www.igfa.org/species/230-spearfish-atlantic.aspx

Yes this is a fish normally caught in the Atlantic. Sure would love to see a picture of the one released yesterday. Because we do have short billed spearfish in the Pacific. Mostly Hawaii and farther West. Well I know they catch them in Hawaii and we could catch them off Guam. This is not the first long-billed Atlantic Spearfish caught in Cabo waters. I’ve seen a picture of angler with the fish from about 20 years ago. The thinking was the spearfish got lost and came through the Panama Canal to get here.

The full moon is Monday the 29th of October. I expect as we get closer the blue and black marlin bite will pick up. We sure hope to see some big fish at the scales.

All fish that are brought to the scales are donated to DIF and Casa Hogar to feed kids that are less fortunate! That can be a lot of fish fingers!

So here it is your link to day 2 of the richest fishing tournament in the world!
By the way, Wayne said yesterday this years pot is almost $2,500,000.
We have 107 teams with 690 anglers! Of course our household is rooting or Sporty Game!
So here is the link, that would be the boat George is fishing on!

http://bisbee12.catchstat.com/Default.aspx

Go Team Sporty Game!!!

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com

http://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report
October 14-22, 2012

WEATHER: Once again the great weather continues! This week our nighttime lows were in the mid 70’s and the daytime highs stayed in the low 90’s. Combine that with a humidity level that has been in the mid to high 20% range, sunny skies and light breezes and you can understand why this is the perfect time to be here. Not only that, but if you are a fisherman, the action this week, and normally this time of year, has been great!
WATER: On the Pacific side of the Cape this week we had blue water, really blue to the north of the lighthouse and just a slightly off-color blue closer to home, at least late in the week. Very early in the week the water close to home and off of the lighthouse was a dirty green. This was probably due to the large swells produced by the passing of Hurricane Paul. Later in the week the water on the Pacific had swells in the 2-5 foot range with a bit of wind picking up in the afternoons putting some chop on the water within 6 miles of the beach, but it was a bit smoother farther offshore. Water temperatures have been between 81 degrees offshore to the north to 85 degrees 10 miles off the beach inside the San Jaime Bank area. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water has been just a bit off color with an occasional spot of dirty water, but for the most part very fishable. The temperatures have been 85 degrees with a few areas showing as high as 88 degrees. Swells have been small to non-existent at 1-3 feet with no wind within 20 miles of shore.
BAIT: Sardines could be had here in Cabo this week, probably due to the demand of the tournament boats who use them to catch skip jack and small Yellowfin for bait. A scooped bucket would set you back $25, but they were in much better shape than the Sardines we were getting earlier in the week from bait boats farther north. Caballito and Mullet could be had easily at $3 each, and there were frozen Bally-hoo for $3 each.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: I am going to give some data here, then some explanations, so be ready. First off, there were two Billfish tournaments held in Cabo this week, the Los Cabos Billfish Tournament, scheduled for three days but fished only two days due to swells from the passing of Hurricane Paul on Tuesday, the first day scheduled. The second tournament was the Bisbee Los Cabos Offshore Tournament, fished on Saturday and Sunday. This tournament is the reason the report is a day late, I was fishing in it. What we have then are 37 boats fishing the first tournament for two days and 80 boats fishing the second for 2 days, a total of 234 fishing days. During that time frame there were a total of 51 billfish either brought in or released, an average of just under 1 fish for four days of fishing. That’s not a great statistic, especially for an area known as the billfish capital of the world, but here is a quick explanation. Most of the boats fishing these tournaments were fishing for large Marlin. There were three fish weighed in over 300 pounds among the 51 caught, a 483 pound Black Marlin, a 583 and a 565 pound Blue Marlin. 1 Black Marlin, 12 Blue Marlin, 23 Striped Marlin and 13 Sailfish were released. These numbers would have been much higher, if the weights smaller, if the target for the tournaments would have been numbers instead of size. On the boat I fished, we only pulled very large lures for a reason. Elephants eat peanuts, but so do monkeys, and we only wanted elephants, so we did not pull anything a monkey could eat. Many boats did the same thing. So there you go, for a tournament, 1 fish per 4 days is a bit slow here, but the average was higher for regular charters. The catch per unit of effort was about the same for both tournaments, so it appears that the moon phase has not had a great effect so far. That could change for the Black and Blue Tournament coming up this week as the moon will be just before full instead of coming off new phase into the first quarter.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: Yellowfin were the high point of the past week for many boats fishing, both in the tournaments and regular charters. Some stats for you that might make you thing about coming down and entering the Tuna Tournament the first week of November: 4 tournament days of fishing, with very few boats targeting Yellowfin resulted in tuna weighing 247 and 227 in the first tournament, and in the second tournament the top five weighed in were 314, 299, 276, 234 and 218. That’s 7 fish over 200 pounds, a better success ratio by 100% than that of large Marlin. This is not counting the fish that were under 200 pounds! Many of these large fish were caught off of the inner and outer Gorda Banks, an area that has been producing some large fish for the past few weeks. Slow trolling live skip jack and Bolito on the surface or on down-riggers produced the hook-ups. The success rates on the hook-ups is probably higher than normal for a couple of reasons. One is that most of the tuna were caught by boats trying to catch a large Black Marlin, so the gear was much stronger than that used by normal charters, and the fact that most of the baits were fished on very strong flouro-carbon leader, 400 to 500 pound breaking strength. There were Tuna caught in other areas as well, and some of them were very nice sized, with a few in the 100+ class and most in the 25-35 pound class. Boats working the outside of the Cabrillo Seamount, the south side of the San Jaime Bank and the north side of the Golden Gate Bank found dolphin pods that held fish. Some of the dolphin looked like a catch would be guaranteed, dolphin feeding everywhere and hundreds of birds working, only to produce no strikes, but if you kept searching you would find a pod with fish on it eventually. Making a 20 to 30 mile run to get to the fish was the only issue, once out there it was a matter of time for most boats. Small lures, large lures, it didn’t seem to matter, if the fish were hungry they would eat. If not, go find the next school.

DORADO: It might be a tie this week for fish of the week between the excellent Tuna fishing we have been experiencing and the large numbers of Dorado that showed up once again. It did take a couple of days at the start of the week for the fishing to pick back up after the passing of Hurricane Paul, but it did get better. Not all boats were able to get limits but most were able to get enough Dorado to keep anglers happy, then on Friday one boat found a very large dead whale just to the south of the Golden Gate Bank. Mike reported that he saw “thousands” of Dorado around the whale when he arrived, the first boat on the scene. They released all the small ones and kept their limit of fish over 20 pounds, eventually releasing 25 fish that were smaller. Other boats came in on the action and did very well, and on Saturday it was a parking lot, albeit a stinky one if you were downwind, but by the afternoon the bite had died off. Still, most of the boats were able to catch limits of good sized fish for two days. Elsewhere, there was a decent bite along the Pacific shoreline out to two miles from the Los Arcos area to Todo Santos, and a scattering of fish on the Cortez side. The tournaments had Dorado of 54, 45, 42, 41 and 40 pounds as the top 5 fish for the second tournament and 42, 39 and 28 for the first tournament. Imagine the numbers if Dorado had been the target instead of Marlin!
WAHOO: We did not hear of any Wahoo being caught in the tournaments this week, even though there was a category for them in the first tournament. Also, there were none I heard of from the charter fleets, but possibly a few were caught.
INSHORE: Early in the week the large surf conditions from the passing of Hurricane Paul made fishing close to the shore dangerous. Later in the week there were some small Roosterfish as well as some Amberjack caught, and a half-way decent bite on Snapper and Grouper by those fishing the bottom. Most of the Pangas in the early and mid week were fishing just offshore for Dorado. At the end of the week the fishing outside of the Cabo Real area in 200 feet of water turned on for football Yellowfin and large White Skipjack, something for the tournament boats to keep in mind next week!
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe!
NOTES: This report may be a bit longer than normal, but it has been a while since I have had this many days on the water in a row. Being out there makes it so much more detailed, just wish I was fishing myself four or five days a week instead of one or two if I am lucky! Our fingers are crossed for a big fish in the coming Black and Blue tournament, we will be fishing Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. If you want to follow the live action you can log onto the Bisbee website and click on “live action”. Hopefully you will see “Sporty Game” on the leader-board! OK, off to post this and then get the lawn cut. My music for this week was “Black Joe Lewis and the Honey Bears” on their CD “Scandalous” on Lost Highway Records. He sounds like the new James Brown! Thanks for the CD Mark! Until next week, tight lines!