Bar Burns!!!

Just a quick not for all of you who visit or live here in Cabo. Last night, one of the most succesful new bars in Cabo burned down. The “Happy Endings Bar” had just put a new palapa on the top floor a short while ago and last night it apparently caught fire. All the boats in the Marina were covered in ash this morning and from what we saw in a quick drive-by, the only thing left of the palapa was the blackened framework. The floor had dropped and you could see where it came throught into the bar below. I am sure with the water damage it will be a while before this business is back up and running, but as with everything here, you just never know! Thats it for now, we have no other info, but if we hear anything we will let you know!

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Cabo Fish Report

Cabo Fish Report.

Cabo Fish Report

 
CABO SAN LUCAS FISH REPORT
Capt. George Landrum
Fly Hooker Sportfishing
http://www.flyhooker.com
gmlandrum@hotmail.com

December 20-26, 2010

Weather: No, no snow from Santa even though to us who have lived in the tropics for so long felt as if it was going to happen any minute as we had a few mornings where it was just below 60 degrees. I am layered up as I sit here on the keyboard, and am debating with myself about taking our retriever on her Sunday beach walk. Our daytime highs were in the mid 80’s, which was nice, but I still got a bit chilled when the wind blew. We had that happen for a few days early in the week, nothing strong, but enough to ruffle up the water.

Water: The cool green water we had last week in front of us has continued on through this week, but the currents have caused it to form a large plume as cool as 68 degrees and running along the Pacific coast and continuing on in a southeasterly direction at least 50 miles once past us. The water on either side of this cool plume has been as warm as 75 degrees and blue. Surface conditions this week were excellent as the winds that plagued us last week finally let up.

Bait: Bait was a bit of a problem to get at times this week. It may have been due to the holiday atmosphere as the bait boats were not going out early, instead content to catch a few fish for their regular clients then returning home. There were small Caballito here in Cabo, if you wanted larger ones, or more bait than just a few you had to make the run up to San Jose. Prices were normal at $3 per bait, but I hate paying that for “look-downs” and 5” Caballito.

FISHING

Billfish: Striped Marlin were an on one day, off the next, then on again event this week. Just before the water turned the bite was great with plenty of fish being seen in the Migraino are on the Pacific side, then overnight the water turned over and became cool and green. Poof, they were gone. Two days later they were back but would not bite. Next day gone again, but appeared 5 miles off the lighthouse and were biting well. Sigh, why is it so hard to figure out what something with such a small brain is going to do? When the bite was on the boats that had the right bait were getting three or four releases, others with the wrong bait might get one or two bites. One day rigged ballyhoo worked well, the next day they would not touch anything except 10” Caballito. Almost all the action took place on the Pacific side of the Cape.

Yellowfin Tuna: Again, this was a very on-off fishery this week as the schools moved constantly. One day they were 4 miles off the beach to the south, then next day 25 miles out and the following day over on the Pacific side just inside the San Jaime Bank. I did not hear of any large fish but there were decent fish to 35 pounds caught. If you were in them at the right time all the lines would go off and you could limit out fairly quickly. It also helped if you were one of the first boats there! We had one client who only caught one small football size fish his first day, but went again two days later and got tired of reeling them in.

Dorado: The cool water has really shut down the Dorado bite even though a few fish are still being caught. They are being found in the warmer water but the number of fish is down quite a bit. The size has averaged 12 pounds with a few fish larger and smaller. The area around Punta Gorda and San Jose seems to be holding more fish than elsewhere, but the warm water to the southwest of the Cape has it’s share as well.

Wahoo: No Wahoo were seen or reported to me this week, but there are always a few out there.

Inshore: It seems as if Sierra were almost the only fish to be found in numbers this week as the Pangas concentrated on the beach areas on the Pacific side. The boats fishing the Cortez side did well on a variety of fish, from Dorado to small Yellowfin and little Roosters as as well as a variety of less wanted fish like Lady fish, Needle fish and Skipjack. Chumming with Sardinas brought on this action in the Palmilla and Inman areas.

Notes: If you are getting your own fishing licenses, you must have pesos!!! The people that sell the licenses around the marina can no longer take dollars from anyone. Get pesos the day before! No one has change for your US $100 at 6AM.

Jean-Luc Ponty was my music selection for this week as his electric and classic violin playing on the 1982 Atlantic Records “Mystical Adventures” caught my ear once again. Until next week, tight lines!
If you can’t wait until Monday, the blog is updated on Sundays! Available only at
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Cabo Fish Report.

Cabo Fish Report

 
CABO SAN LUCAS FISH REPORT
Capt. George Landrum
Fly Hooker Sportfishing
http://www.flyhooker.com
gmlandrum@hotmail.com

December 13-19, 2010

Weather: Almost Christmas and still no snow, what is going on? Oh well, I guess with daytime temps in the mid 80’s and nights around the low 60’s we won’t be seeing much of that white stuff anytime soon. Breaks my heart (not!). We had mostly sunny skies this week and starting on Monday we experienced quite a bit of wind, most of it coming from the northwest. On Saturday it swung a bit and came from the east then died off and now it is nice and calm.

Water: All week long we have had a small area of cold water right in front of Cabo. The water has been 68 degrees while everywhere else it has been 71 degrees. The only other area of cold water we have seen is to the west of the San Jaime Bank where it was also 68 degrees. This cold water in front of us has also been off-color with a lot of green. The Pacific side of the Cape has continued to have good blue water while on the Cortez side up to the north, around the east cape, it has started to become greenish as well. When the wind started to blow on Tuesday the Pacific side became very rough and hard to fish. Most boats stayed to the south and the Cortez side of the Cape.

Bait: Caballito, Mackerel and Mullet were all available at the usual $3 each. There were a few Sardinas in San Jose at $25 a scoop.

FISHING

Billfish: We still are not seeing the numbers of Striped Marlin we expected, but we may have been spoiled with the success of the past several years. I don’t know if it is a current issue, a bait issue or a commercial fishing issue, but they just have not been there in great numbers. We are still seeing fish, and they are still not biting well though. Most boats are seeing several dozen per trip but are lucky if they hook up one or two. And, surprisingly, there are still big fish around. We had clients fish on Thursday who found the Pacific side too rough, and the target was Striped Marlin. They turned to the Cortez side and ended up with a Black Marlin of #450 instead. It was a 40 minute fight for Bill Cook.

Yellowfin Tuna: While there were not a lot of Tuna caught this week, the boats that did get into them did very well, limiting out on fish that ranged from football to school size. Most of the action occurred to the south of Cabo or out to the west. Of course the problem was the water conditions. The winds we had made the swells large, sometimes 7-9 feet and there was chop on it, a lot of chop. The type of conditions I sometimes describe as a field of sheep. Anyway, there were fish out there, and they were biting steadily, but you had to be strong. Some of the Yellowfin went 50 pounds but the average was 20 pounds.

Dorado: Once again scarce, the numbers continue to drop as the water cools down. Fish were still found, and occasionally a boat found a small school and caught limits on fish to 15 pounds, but that was not the norm. Most boats were lucky to get a Dorado strike, and the success ratio was around 15 percent. Close to the beach on the Cortez side and just off of San Jose close to the beach were the best areas. Fish were found close to the beach on the Pacific side, but the water was rough most of the week.

Wahoo: No Wahoo were seen or reported to me this week, but there are always a few out there.

Inshore: Sierra are still the inshore stars, and are likely to continue to be so until the Yellowtail show in greater numbers. Right now you are able to get your fill of Sierra using either Sardinas, small rapallas or hootchies, but the sizes are not much larger than 6 pounds. There are still firecracker Yellowtail showing up and the Amberjack are biting, but no large fish, just in the 10-15 pound class. A few of the Pangas are getting into some Snapper to 10 pounds in the rocks, but the swells and winds have made that a “sometime” event.

Notes: If you are getting your own fishing licenses, you must have pesos!!! The people that sell the licenses around the marina can no longer take dollars from anyone. Get pesos the day before! No one has change for your US $100 at 6AM.

Music this week was a variety of Christmas songs as I wrote this and Mary baked cookies! Merry Christmas, I hope Santa is good to you!
If you can’t wait until Monday, the blog is updated on Sundays! Available only at
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Bite Report

 
CABO SAN LUCAS FISH REPORT
Capt. George Landrum
Fly Hooker Sportfishing
http://www.flyhooker.com
gmlandrum@hotmail.com

December 6-12, 2010

Weather: It all remains the same as our nighttime lows remain in the low 60’s and the daytime highs in the high 80’s. Mostly clear skies and no rain. Almost boring except that we love the “no snow” for Christmas effect!

Water: The water everywhere we could get to on a day charter was 75-75 degrees. Way out to the west, past our range the temperature break had moved to more than 50 miles offshore and there it dropped to 72 degrees. At the end of the week there was a band of warm 77 degree water running from just off of Punta Gorda and southward toward the 1,000 fathom line, and there was a large spot of 78 degree water 30 miles to the south of the Cape.

Bait: Caballito and Mackerel were both available as live bait this week at $3 each. There were fewer Sardinas around our area but reports were that they were still available in San Jose for the boats that wanted to make the 1 hour run up there.

FISHING

Billfish: Last week I said that maybe the moon phase was what was turning the Striped Marlin off their feed. I may have been wrong (wouldn’t be the first time) as even as we come out of the new moon phase the continue to keep their mouths shut. We are still seeing them out there every day, and every day there are a few caught, but there has been no real success stories. A very lucky boat may get one or two releases, but that is a matter of being in the right place at the right time. Of course this means spending a lot of unproductive, boring time focusing in one area, an area where you know there are fish, and hoping that they suddenly go on the feed for a few minutes, or traveling constantly hoping to come across a new batch of fish that are hungry. Either way, Marlin fishing this past week has been fairly unproductive and boring.

Yellowfin Tuna: Yellowfin Tuna continued to be the offshore fish of the week as schools of football and a bit larger fish move in and out of our area. Sometimes as close as 4 miles out and sometimes as far as 25 miles out, they have provided fairly consistent action for fish up to 35 pounds but averaging 15 pounds. Consistent action is one thing, but consistent location is another. These fish have been moving, and moving quickly so the area that produced in the morning may not be the area they are at in the afternoon. This has made for some frustrating days, but when you do get into the fish, it has been great. Along with the football fish have been some that have gone as large as 100 pounds, but they have been far fewer than the smaller fish.

Dorado: Dorado were scarce this past week with only a few boats coming in flying multiple flags, and those have been for fish that have averaged 12 pounds. A few larger fish have been found in the offshore waters, but the majority have been found close to the beach and they have been the smaller fish. Not as many as there were a while ago, to paraphrase a song, they are still available for those who are willing to work for them and think they have the luck.

Wahoo: Among 10 boats fishing a small local tournament for tuna and Wahoo, only one small fish of 12 pounds was brought to the scale. Several days before,friends of ours caught one of 80 pounds, and the day of the tournament another friend lost 7 fish in a row due to leader being bitten through. This shows me there are still fish out there, but preparation is the key to success on these fish. Wire leader, shallower water and either high speed artificial lures or rigged bait slow trolled is what seems to work, at least last week.

Inshore: Sierra have taken over the show for the inshore fishing, but some Yellowtail are beginning to show up as well. While not large, the Sierra have been there in numbers and it was not a problem for most boats to limit out on them quickly. The Yellowtail were a bit larger, but still on the small side at an average of 6 to 8 pounds. Anglers from up north would call them “firecrackers” but they still eat good and fight well if the tackle is matched to their size. A few Amberjack as well as good numbers of Bonito and Skipjack have rounded up the most common inshore catch last week.

Notes: If you are getting your own fishing licenses, you must have pesos!!! The people that sell the licenses around the marina can no longer take dollars from anyone. Get pesos the day before! No one has change for your US $100 at 6AM.

My music this week was Boz Scaggs on his 1994 Virgin Records release “Some Changes”, still one of my favorites!
If you can’t wait until Monday, the blog is updated on Sundays! Available only at
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

 
CABO SAN LUCAS FISH REPORT
Capt. George Landrum
Fly Hooker Sportfishing
http://www.flyhooker.com
gmlandrum@hotmail.com

November 29-December 5, 2010

Weather: Maybe things have stabilized as our temperatures this past week were the same as the week before. Or morning lows were in the low 60’s while the afternoon highs reached the low 90’s. Still no rain, but we did have a couple of days with some light cloud cover.

Water: This week showed no change in where the temperature break was but we did have an overall drop in the water temperature by several degrees. At the end of the week we had a solid 75-76 degrees (79-80 degrees last week) everywhere you looked except for the Pacific side out past the San Jaime and the Golden Gate Banks. Once you got about 5 miles past them, the water temps dropped to 67-68 degrees instead of the 70-71 degrees from last week. That cooler water also had a slight green tinge to it, but not so bad that we did not fish there.

Bait: Caballito and Mullet with an occasional scoop of Sardinas pretty much covered the bases for live bait this week. The normal $3 each for the larger baits and $25 a scoop for Sardinas. There has been some brined and frozen ballyhoo at a rather expensive $4 each in the large “horse” size.

FISHING

Billfish: The lowering in the water temps seems to have brought more Striped Marlin into the area, but the moon phase (maybe) has had the effect of keeping their mouths from opening on most bait and lures. Boats are seeing several dozen fish a day but are lucky to get three or four bites, releasing one or two fish a day. Almost all the action has been on the Pacific side of the Cape just off the beach near drop-offs that concentrate what bait has been out there. There have been plenty of fish offshore as well, but not concentrated in any one area. The lowering temps have pretty much shut off the Blue and Black Marlin bite, but there are always a few fish around, even though I did not hear of any caught this week.

Yellowfin Tuna: As my friend Mike says, football season is here! There have been quite a few scattered schools of football size Yellowfin Tuna this week, with the fish ranging in size from 8 to 25 pounds and a few larger fish to 80 pounds on the outside of the schools. While much more common than they have been, it is still not wide open by any means, but when you do get into the fish there are multiple hook-ups. Hootchies, Sardinas, cedar plugs and small feather have all worked well. The fish have been found from near the shore to 30 miles off the beach and most of them have been to the south and west. Larger fish have been found near the temperature break outside the 1,000 fathom line to the west of us.

Dorado: Cooling water slowed down the Dorado bite for us close to home, but reports from the Punta Gorda area have been that the fishing for Dorado in their area has picked up, and all the way to the East Cape, even though the water is cool, the fishing has been fair to good for these great eating fish. In our area, the water near shore on the Cortez side has produced some decent fish to 25 pounds, and the same depth of water on the Pacific side has produced a few more fish, but in smaller sizes.

Wahoo: I thought that the Wahoo bite was over, but the past two days seemed to have proved me wrong as friends of mine caught 6 yesterday and 2 the day before. Working near shore and trolling slow with rigged dead baits they have been catching Wahoo ranging in size from 25 to 40 pounds. Other boats have been getting one or two here and there, but the fish are still around.

Inshore: A repeat of last week, small Roosterfish, the occasional Yellowtail, some decent Sierra and an occasional Amberjack rounded up the normal inshore catch this week. A few Pangas got into some grouper and snapper, and a few focused on the Dorado, but the mainstay was small Roosters and Sierra. Both sides of the Cape produced, but the Sierra were more concentrated on the Pacific side. The numbers of Yellowfin Tuna have proven to be a big draw and quite a few Pangas are venturing a bit farther offshore in search of the fish.

Notes: If you are getting your own fishing licenses, you must have pesos!!! The people that sell the licenses around the marina can no longer take dollars from anyone. Get pesos the day before! No one has change for your US $100 at 6AM.

As a change of pace I treated myself to some history in my music choice this week. A 2002 RCA release of Jimmy Rodgers music titled “Country Legends, Jimmy Rodgers” caught my eye on the shelf, and the early country blues and yodeling got my toes tapping this morning.
If you can’t wait until Monday, the blog is updated on Sundays! Available only at
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/