Garlic Sesame Fish

this was subed this week by our friend Linda up in Wisconsin.  While the original recipe calls for Halibut, it went over quite well with a nice piece of Dorado or Mahi mahi.  I would imagine Wahoo would taste pretty good too.

I served it up with white rice and cole slaw with rice vinegar/sesame oil dressing

GARLIC-SESAME
HALIBUT

Source:

How to Grill, pg. 280

Method:

Direct Grilling

 

 

Ingredients:
For the marinade:6 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon peeled, grated ginger
1 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro leaves
1 teaspoon washed, chopped cilantro root, or 1 additional
tablespoon cilantro leaves
3 tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup Asian fish sauce or soy sauce, plus more for brushing.  we used oyster sauce since that’s what’s in our frig.
3 tablespoons white wine, sake, or dry sherry
3 tablespoons Asian (dark) sesame oil, plus more for  brushing
(optional)
1 teaspoon coarse salt
1 teaspoon  freshly ground black pepperDirections:Rinse the fish fillets under cold running water and blot dry with
paper towels. Arrange the fillets in a nonreactive baking dish just
large enough to hold them.Prepare the marinade. Pound the
garlic, ginger, cilantro leaves and root, if using, and sugar to a
paste in a mortar with a pestle. Or puree in a minichopper or food
processor. Work in the fish sauce, sake, sesame oil, salt, and
pepper. Spoon the marinade on both sides of the fillets. Cover with
plastic wrap and let marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1
hour, turning once or twice.

Set up the grill for direct
grilling and preheat to high. When ready to cook, oil the fish
basket, if using, or brush and oil the grill grate. Place the fillets
in the basket; if grilling directly on the grill grate, brush or
spray the fillets themselves with oil.

Place the fish or the
fish basket on the hot grate. Grill until each side of the fillets is
browned and cooked through, 4 to 6 minutes per side. Because the
fillets tend to be fragile, I dont generally bother with rotating
them to apply a crosshatch of grill marks. If grilling directly on
the grate, brush the tops of the fillets with oil before gently
turning them with a spatula. To test for do9neness, press a fillet
with your finger; it should break into clean flakes when fully
cooked. Another test is to insert a metal skewer in the side of a
fillet. When it is done, the skewer will come out very hot to the
touch after 20 seconds.

NOTE: To grill a fish fillet on a fish
grate, place the grate on top of the regular grate and preheat to
high. Oil the fish grate with a folded paper towel dipped in oil, or
lift it with tongs and spray with oil. As an added precaution against
sticking, brush or spray the fillets themselves with oil. Arrange
them on the hot fish grate. Grill the fillets, turning them with a
spatula onto a spot on the fish grate not previously occupied by a
fillet. Continue grilling until done.

 

 

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