Cabo Fish Report March 23 – 29, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

March 23, 2015 – March 29, 2015

WEATHER: Once again the weather could not have been better! It did start to get a bit on the warm side late in the week and we had temperatures reach 93 degrees on Saturday, but the early morning hours were almost always in the high 60’s. Of course it was sunny and we saw very few clouds. We did have a few days where the winds picked up to around 15 knots in the afternoon, but most of the early mornings were tickled with very light breezes.

WATER: There is no predicting what we will wake up to every day when it comes to the conditions on the ocean. Last week is not a good indicator of what is to come it appears, and that is just not normal. We usually see a progression, steady and slow, as the water warms or cools. Not this year though. I have been hoping for more cool water to bring down the bait and the Marlin offshore and the Sierra and Yellowtail inshore, but instead we have seen the water warm up. Difficult for me to understand since we have had strong currents from the northwest that should have brought in the cooler water. Instead, this week we saw the near-shore waters on the Pacific side warm up to 74 degrees while the water at the San Jaime and Golden Gate Banks was a warm 75 degrees. On the Cortez side of the Cape it was even warmer with the near-shore and offshore waters at 75-76 degrees. Well, I guess I do understand it a little bit since we have had swells (4-6 feet) coming from the southerly directions this week, and last week the warmer water was to the south and the currents were not as strong. The clarity of the water was fair with an occasional patch of clean blue water, but for the most part, particular inshore, the water was a bit cloudy, perhaps due to the churning of the surf.

BAIT: With the warmer water the Mackerel became very scarce so most of the bait was either Caballito or Green Jacks, with a mix of misc. fish as well. Normal price at $3 per bait and there were frozen local (from La Paz) Ballyhoo at $3 per piece. If you traveled up to San Jose and were early or called ahead to one of the bait boats, you might, just might, have been able to get some Sardinas as well.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: The Striped Marlin remain elusive as the bait is not here. If the bait (mackerel) had moved into the area there would be plenty of Marlin, at least that is what past experience tells us. I have it on good sources that there are plenty of Marlin and bait up by Mag Bay (on the Pacific side) but we are seeing few fish here. My guess is that about 10% of the boats are getting a Marlin (those who are looking for them). Since the bite has been slow, most of the boats are looking for either Dorado or Tuna offshore or fishing near the beach for bottom-fish or Sierra and Yellowtail. The few Marlin that were found were hungrier than they appeared last week, but the numbers are just not there to make it a good bite, despite what some business have posted to the public. Maybe if they told the truth people would not book a boat? Anyway, it all comes down to the fact that you most definitely will not catch one while sitting on the beach drinking a beer!

YELLOWFIN TUNA: I did not see any Yellowfin this week but have heard that they were popping up occasionally on the high spots up by Punta Gorda. The bite was reported as sporadic on fish from 12 to 30 pounds, most of them caught on drifted Sardinas. A couple of boats reported finding a few spots of tuna with no indicators such as birds or porpoise while fishing to the southwest about 15 miles, but without the indicators the schools were very difficult to find and then follow. These fish were on blind strikes and were again the smaller sizes we call footballs, from 6 to 15 pounds. Those boats that did find them reported getting two or three fish then losing the schools.

DORADO: The Dorado bite has been very inconsistent, good here one day, good there the next and nowhere to be found on the third day, sigh. There were a few nice fish in the 20-30 pound class caught by lucky anglers, but most of them were between 8 and 12 pounds, and the success ratio was decent but not great at around 25-30%. It was good to throw a live bait out when you hooked up on the troll since quite a few of the boats that caught Dorado came in with two by doing exactly that.

WAHOO: These fish were the surprise of the week since there were more of them that we usually see this time of year (normally none!). The warm water has to have something to do with that. The fact that we have a waxing moon may have helped as well. I did not see any large Wahoo hit the docks, but most of the fish were around 12 to 15 pounds. Many more were hooked than were caught, and the ones that were caught in our area were boated by anglers trolling small swimming plugs on wire leader for Sierra.

INSHORE: Good one week, slow the next, this season I have given up trying to predict where the fish are going to be or even what kind will be there. I know the Sierra bite has come to a screaming halt with the better catches being 6 to 10 fish per boat but most of the boats were lucky to get one or two. As we expected, the Snapper bite dropped off once we got away from the full moon, but perhaps it will improve this next week as we will see another full moon on the 4th. There have been a few Amberjack and Jack Crevalle and these fish put up a good fight on light gear and the Amberjack are great to eat. There have also been some Pompano caught, one again great eating. The swells and the surf made fishing close in a bit touchy, and also caused the water to become silted and murky, but once in 50 feet of water everything was fine.

NOTES: Whales are still being seen every day, and in good numbers! Spring break is in full swing so I avoid going to the beach due to the crowds, and with Semana Santa coming up (Easter week is a major holiday in Mexico, and those who can, head to the beach) I will be staying home more often than not.

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Once again, I will be posting my Music Of The Week every report. This is music that I have either just discovered and want to share (it may be a band or album you are already familiar with, but new to me) or one of my old favorites I have just “re-discovered”. In any event, take a moment to check it out, you may find a new favorite!

This weeks Music of the Week is the 1973 Verve Records release “Compact Jazz – Charlie Parker”. Guest artists on the album are Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, John Lewis and Max Roach. Great music! I am putting all my 600+ CD’s on the computer and keep coming across old favorites like this, and am happy to share my interest with you.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site and you may like it. Still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

Meanwhile, Tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report for March 16 – 22, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

March 16, 2015 – March 22, 2015

WEATHER: I love it here this time of year! Our highs for the week were in the high 80’s and the lows in the high 60’s. Clear skies and light winds made it perfect to be out on the water fishing. If only the fish would co-operate a bit more it would be perfect, sigh. One unusual thing happened that I have never seen here before, and that was hail in San Jose. Actually I have never seen hail here anywhere at all, but early this week there was a patch of weather that moved through and it brought some rain, gusty winds and hail north of us, and there were waterspouts reported offshore. All of that was fast passing through though, for the rest of the week the weather was fine!

WATER: There was a little bit of change this week from last week as the water continued to clear up a bit. There was warm 76 degree water 30 miles to the south-east, the water was 72 degrees inside of that, and all up along the Pacific coast, at least as far as the charter boats have been going. On the Cortez side of the cape it is a bit warmer at 74 degrees outside of San Jose. It appears that the warmer the water, the clearer it is so we can look for an improvement in clarity as currents push that warm 76 degree water toward us (maybe). Swells were in the 4-6 foot range this week and for the most part the winds were light. We did have a couple of days late in the week where there were some stronger winds in the morning, and from the southwest, that made if a bit choppy and rough, but these conditions did not last for long.

BAIT: There was no change in Bait availability this week. Last week started to include some Mackerel, but I did not see or hear of any this week. Most of the bait has been Caballito and Green Jacks, like last week. There are Sardinas available from the commercial boats in San Jose on occasion, but I have heard that they are small ones and that the amounts being caught were small as well, probably due to the swells and winds up there.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: I truly don’t know what to say about, or expect, from our Striped Marlin, but I sure hope they show up in good numbers soon. My fear is that this is a big El Nino year and the fish will stay north in the cooler water. My fingers are crossed that this cooler water will reach here, along with the bait and the Marlin because this week and last week they were not seen as much as is normal. I mean, fish were seen, but only one to four a day by most boats, and the majority of those fish were not hungry. A few boats this week were able to find small areas where there were hungry Marlin and manged to release two or three, but normally we would be seeing masses of Striped Marlin piling on the Golden Gate Banks and at the lighthouse ledge. The fish that were caught were almost 100% on live bait, they did not seem to have the hunger or energy to chase plastic lures for long, appearing in the pattern for a second then sinking out. The ones that were caught were hooked on a live bait tossed right in their face, and the bait for the most part needed to be slightly stunned so the marlin could get them. I hope next week improves.

YELLOWFIN TUNA: Scarce to non-existent as far as our anglers were concerned, Yellowfin were once again hiding from us. There were reports of a few fish from the high spots up by Punta Gordo, and there was an occasional blind strike while trolling around, but we did not see any big schools with porpoise. Boats went southeast toward the warmer, clearer water hoping for Blue Marlin, Dorado and Wahoo and many found porpoise, but they held no Tuna.

DORADO: Two Dorado during a trip was a good catch this week, and a few boats improved on that by releasing a Marlin during the trip, but the numbers are just not there any more. The sizes of the Dorado have been great, but small fish grow into large fish and we have not been seeing very many small Dorado this week. Almost all the fish caught the week were either on lures while trolling, or on live or cut bait and caught by boats trying close to the beach for Yellowtail. Several boats were able to find Frigate Birds working and run over to throw a bait hoping it was a sign of Marlin, only to get bit by a Dorado. Not what they were hoping for, but with offshore fishing slow like this they were happy to get a fish!

WAHOO: I did not hear of any Wahoo this week although I am sure there were a few caught. I did hear one boat call over the radio that they had limited out on Wahoo but also heard anglers in the background talking about all the big Sierra, haha!

INSHORE: This was the area of the week for catching fish as offshore was very slow. Not quite as hot as last week, there were still Snapper to be found in the rocks but for a few days toward the end of the week the swells and gusty wind made getting in there and fishing difficult. Another factor was the moon phase since the Snapper form spawning aggregations during the full moon (last week) and then disburse. Yellowtail are still scarcer than normal, but the ones being caught have been nice fish. Some decent Amberjack have had anglers fighting hard, these fish have been between 15 and 35 pounds, perfect size for catching and eating. The high point this week for our fishery was the Sierra. A schooling fish, where there is one there will be more, so you could see packs of three to five boats working small areas. Most were able to catch plenty although few of them limited out, and some of the ones caught weighed up to nine pounds. Hootchies in bright pink or red worked great and caught a few Snapper as well, but rigged dead bait trolled deep was the ticket for the larger Sierra. Trolled small plastic bodied swimming plugs would normally get hammered, but did not seem to work as well as other methods.

NOTES: I feel an explanation is in order as to why I have not done a report in so long. My beautiful, wonderful wife Mary was diagnosed with Brain Cancer in January of 2013. We spent 18 months fighting the battle before we lost on August 10 of last year. With the travels for surgery, radiation and chemo, as well as the needed 24/7 attention I had to let the report, as well as the business, take a seat out of the way. I am back now and plan to continue where I left off.

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Once again, I will be posting my Music Of The Week every report. This is music that I have either just discovered and want to share (it may be a band or album you are already familiar with, but new to me) or one of my old favorites I have just “re-discovered”. In any event, take a moment to check it out, you may find a new favorite!

This weeks Music of the Week is the three CD collection “Watching the Dark, the history of Richard Thompson”, a 1993 compilation of his work, from the start of the “Fairport Convention” to the end of his career. His moody, Celtic influenced guitar work was extremely unique and influenced an amazing number of musicians. I think you might enjoy listening to his playing and singing. Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site and you may like it. Still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

Meanwhile, Tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

March 9 – 15, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com http://www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
March 9, 2015 – March 15, 2015

WEATHER: Good morning everyone, and hello from mostly sunny Cabo San Lucas! We did have a few days this week with overcast skies and yesterday (Saturday the 14th) we actually had a spit of rain from some weather that moved on top of us from the north. Heavy clouds with some lightning and thunder gave pause to those looking to golf, go to the beach or head out on the water, but it all moved away overnight. This week our daytime highs reached 88 degrees while the daytime lows dropped to 65. Those heavy clouds from yesterday also caused a short lasting shift in the wind and it blew from the south rather hard for about four hours, a few boats had to battle the elements on the way in from up the Pacific side. For the majority of the week we had great weather, so good that if it was like this all year round we would be overcrowded!
WATER: The water continues to cool down a little at a time, which is good news for our typical winter fish, but is chasing away the warm water fish we still have lurking about. The coldest water around is at 68 degrees and covers the area between the Golden Gate Bank to the San Jaime Bank just south of the Golden. Inshore along the same area it is almost 70 degrees while the shore area to the north and south is 72 degrees. Water to the south of us is the warmest in the area at 73 degrees close to shore and rising to 75 degrees farther out at 20+ miles. On the Cortez side of the Cape within 20 miles of the beach it has been a consistent 73 degrees. Water clarity has improved across the area and we were seeing very few of the green bands this week. This banding normally happens as our water changes from cool to warm or the other way around with the cool water holding more plankton and chlorophyll, thus the greener water.
BAIT: Bait this week started to include some Mackerel, which is a good sign for the upcoming few months as these baitfish signal the cooling water and hopefully the return of the Striped Marlin. Most of the bait however has been Caballito and Green Jacks, like last week. There are also Sardinas now available from the commercial boats in San Jose.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: Until the water cools to a consistent 70 degrees and the Mackerel show up in numbers we are likely to continue to have slow fishing for Striped Marlin. A few boats this week were able to find hungry fish, but most boats saw no sign of them. Most of the ones found were found on the Pacific side in the cooler water. As a good sign of things to come, the water on the Pacific has slowly cooled, and we can see this trend working its way down the coast so hopefully soon the bite will pick up. Meanwhile, the fish that have been found have averaged 110 pounds with a few reported in the 150-180 class, most of them caught on a live bait thrown to a tailing fish.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: There was not a lot of change this week in the Tuna fishing as it is still an on-one-day, off-the-next-day type of fishery. Almost all the action to be had was from the Cortez side of the Cape, up off of the Punta Gorda area and the high spots such as the San Luis and Inman banks. That is a very long run for the boats out of Cabo, so most of the action was reserved for boats leaving from San Jose. Also, since it takes a long two hours to get there (including the stop for Sardinas in San Jose) most of the San Jose boats had already set up on the spots leaving the Cabo boats hoping to get some leftovers. Good news is that they are showing up and are not absent like last week! If conditions continue, we might be seeing these Tuna in the Cabo area in a couple of weeks. Most of the fish that were caught we hooked on live Sardinas drifted over the high spots.

DORADO: Dorado are a fish that prefers warmer water than we are seeing now, so it is no surprise that the numbers being caught are dropping off. As was the case last week, the larger numbers being found are to the north of the Golden Gate Bank along the beach. A good catch this week would have been two or three fish, boats fishing offshore or along the beach closer to home were lucky to get one Dorado, let alone two. Many boats this week came in without flags, having only drawn a strike or two all day. It is sad to think of, but that is the way fishing is. We will continue to see a few Dorado being caught for the next few months, but the numbers keep decreasing as the water temperature drops.
WAHOO: Surprisingly we are still seeing Wahoo being brought in, and some nice ones at that. Well, maybe not all that surprising since we have just gone through the full moon phase this week, and Wahoo do bite better on the full moon. The surprising part is that we are catching them, we normally do not get these numbers in the Cabo area although they are common in season around the Mag Bay and Ridge area. These fish are running from 12 to 45 pounds and are being caught in a variety of ways. The most common has been as an accidental catch while fishing for Dorado and Marlin, the second most common has been while drifting live baits, either Mackerel for Yellowtail or Sardinas for Tuna. Naturally most of the fish hooked have been lost since both of these methods require the use of a monofiliment leader, but still some anglers have lucked out! High spots and drop-offs are the preferred areas for these fish and trolling them at higher than normal speed with deep swimming plugs on wire leader has had the best retention rate once the fish are hooked up. Being a pack type of fish, often more than one will strike at the same time, causing the cockpit to get hectic.
INSHORE: Inshore has definitely been the best fishing this past week with plenty of Snapper, some good Sierra and a few large Yellowtail being found. Fishing from 400 to 50 feet of water with live and cut bait was the best producing method, letting the baits down to near the boattom with Yellowtail on live bait deep, Snapper on cut bait in medium depths and Sierra on hootchies and small rapallas in the shallows. Any of these areas and methods were likely to produce other fish as well with an occasional Amberjack and Grouper clamping onto a bait, and an occasional attack by passing Wahoo. I had clients out on a Panga on Wednesday who managed to get three or four Sierra as well as nine nice Red Snapper, a very good thing since their friends who went out all day on an offshore cruiser only managed to get one Dorado hooked up, which jumped three times then came off.
NOTES: I feel an explanation is in order as to why I have not done a report in so long. My beautiful, wonderful wife Mary was diagnosed with Brain Cancer in January of 2013. We spent 18 months fighting the battle before we lost on August 10 of last year. With the travels for surgery, radiation and chemo, as well as the needed 24/7 attention I had to let the report, as well as the business, take a seat out of the way. I am back now and plan to continue where I left off.
The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.
Once again, I will be posting my Music Of The Week every report. This is music that I have either just discovered and want to share (it may be a band or album you are already familiar with, but new to me) or one of my old favorites I have just “re-discovered”. In any event, take a moment to check it out, you may find a new favorite!
This weeks Music of the Week is the album “Change In My Pocket”, a 1990 release from Bullseye Blues and Jazz, by Anson Funderburgh and the Rockets featuring Sam Myers. Great music by some great artists, its a wonderful album to sit and listen to! Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like, check out http://www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site and you may like it. Still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.
Meanwhile, Tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report for March 1-8, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com

www.flyhooker.com

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

March 1, 2015 – March 8, 2015

WEATHER: Unlike those of you living in the north, our weather remained very comfortable this week. Our daily highs were in the mid to high 80’s and the nighttime lows averaged 67 degrees with a low in town of 62 degrees. The wind shifted during the week, coming from the northwest at the start of the week and then shifting and coming from the northeast mid-week and then back from the northwest again at the end of the week. Starting mid-week we had cloud cover move in which put the sunbathers in a bad mood but was great for fishing.

WATER: On the Pacific side we were seeing water temperatures range from 72 degrees at the San Jaime and Golden Gate Bank to 71 degrees right along the beach. On the Sea of Cortes side at the Gordo Banks it was 73/74 degrees while at the Cabrillo Seamount it was showing 75 degrees. Off of Gray Rock it was 74 degrees and that temperature as well at the 95 Spot. There was a spot of cooler, slightly off color water between Cabo and San Jose at 72 degrees and about 5-10 miles offshore. To the south of the Cape we had 75-76 degree water. The water on the Pacific side and to the south has become progressivly cleaner and bluer as the week has progressed.

BAIT: Bait has been almost all Green Jacks and Caballito but some of the boats have had frozen Ballyhoo and all these have been at $3 each.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: Billfish have been scarce this past week as the water temperatures are finally adjusting to our winter conditions. It has been colder than the Blue and Black Marlins prefered range so few of them were seen or hooked, and while normally we see lots of Striped Marlin right now, the bait has not arrived in any quantity, and these fish follow the bait. Not to say they are not out there, boats are getting a shot almost every day, and some boats multiple shots, but we are not getting the intense concentrations we are used to. Perhaps it will begin soon. Boats that have been getting Striped Marlin bites have been finding them to the north on the Pacific side, well past Migreino Beach, and the average has been one or two bites per trip. I went out last week due south 45 miles looking for tuna and we jumped a Swordfish, a decent size one, but saw no other billfish.

YELLOWFIN TUNA: I really don’t know hat to say about the Tuna bite this past week except that it was slow, very slow. There were a few fish found on the Gordo Banks, but only one or two nice fish per day. Further up the Cortez side off of Punta Gordo there was some action on smaller football fish at the Inman Banks and an occasional pod of Porpoise offshore in that area that supplied a few fish to 35 pounds. Once in a while a pod of Porpoise to the south would show up and some decent fish were caught, to 35 pounds, but it was a “one day here, next day gone” type of thing. It was a long way to go on a hope and a prayer.

DORADO: The Dorado bite is still on as you can see from the flags on the boats coming into the marina, but while the numbers are smaller every week, the size of the fish gets larger. We fished the Pacific side up to Todo Santos early in the week and found Dorado past Migrienos, and they were nice fish. We ended up with four that were almost all bewteen 20 and 25 pounds. There were two bites on lures and when the fish was brought close to the boat we threw out a live bait and managed to hook another one each time. This was also the area we had two Striped Marlin bites in. Almost all the Dorado I heard of being caught were on the Pacific side in water between 80 and 400 feet deep. Few fish were found deeper, it may be because the baitfish are close to the beach right now.

WAHOO: There have been some decent Wahoo brought in this week with a few boats getting into one or two fish off of the ridges just off the beach and off of current/temperature breaks offshore. Nothing like the one boat that returned with 17 fish last week. When I first heard that I thought someone was playing a joke and that they were talking about “Mexican Wahoo”, meaning Sierra, but a buddy of mine actually saw the fish and confirmed the catch. Once in a while when things are perfect that happens, but it is rare!

INSHORE: The main target for inshore fishing this week was the Red Snapper, Cubera Snapper and Barred Pargo right in the rocks on the Pacific side. Anglers loose a lot of gear fishing in there, but that is what you have to do to get them. A two ounce sinker, five feet of heavy flouro-carbon leader and a live bait tossed right into the pockets in the rocks, using heavy test line in order to horse the fish out of the protection of the rocks. Done correctly you loose lots of rigs but catch lots of fish. Anglers fishing in close from Pangas were getting four to ten nice fish every trip, with the best bite being in the morning or just at high tide. There are also Sierra along the beach, but using a wire bite tippet is almost a necessity to keep from loosing too many expensive lures. The problem with that is that it also reduces the number of bites that you get. It is a delicate balance to figure out in order to get a decent catch. Also, less I forget, there has been some very nice Yellowtail brought in, some of them pushing 40 pounds, but the average has been more in the 12-15 pound class. These fish have been found in water ranging from 80 to 350 feet, using yo-yo’s in scrambled egg (always a good choice when prospecting), chrome diamond jigs and slow trolled deep diving Rapallas as well as live bait dropped down with a lead weight.

NOTES: I feel an explanation is in order as to why I have not done a report in so long. My beautiful, wonderful wife Mary was diagnosed with Brain Cancer in January of 2013. We spent 18 months fighting the battle before we lost on August 10 of last year. With the travels for surgery, radiation and chemo, as well as the needed 24/7 attention I had to let the report, as well as the business, take a seat out of the way. I am back now and plan to continue where I left off starting with this report.

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captians who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Once again, I will be posting my Music Of The Week every report. This is music that I have either just discovered and want to share (it may be a band or album you are already familiar with, but new to me) or one of my old favorites I have just “re-discovered”. In any event, take a moment to check it out, you may find a new favorite!

This weeks Music of the Week is the album “All My Heros” with the violinist (fiddler) Mark O’Conner. He plays duets with all of the artists he grew up listening to and tried to lear from. My favorite cut is the first track, “New Country”. This song is one I had tied into my alarm clock for many years, just the music you need to get you up and moving in the morning.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site and you may like it. Still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

Meanwhile, Tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/