Cabo Fish Report Nov. 7 – 23, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Nov. 7 – 23, 2015

SYNOPSIS: A two week break since my last report mostly because little has changed. Tuna are out there a ways, mostly footballs, Dorado are around and there are some nice ones, a few Wahoo recently since we had the right moon phase, scattered Striped Marlin and a few Sailfish and an occasional Blue, inshore remained a bit slow.

WEATHER: Until two days ago we were having the perfect weather with nighttime lows down to 68 degrees and daytime highs in the mid 80’s. Several days ago it changed a bit with higher humidity and higher temperatures. Daytime highs up to 98 degrees and nighttime lows in the mid 70’s. We had some clouds move in, enough that we thought we might receive a bit of rain, but that has not happened yet. We had a few days of strong winds from the northwest that made for choppy conditions on the Pacific but it has calmed down a bit.

WATER: Swells on the Pacific side have been in the 3-5 foot range and on the Cortez side of the Cape they were smaller at 1-3 feet. The water on the Pacific side has been much cleaner and clearer than the water on the Cortez side but there has only been a temperature difference of one degree. Water on the Pacific side has been around 82 degrees with a strong current from the south, on the Cortez side it has been around 81 degrees with a weak movement of water for the most part. When you combine water temperature, clarity and current movement the best fishing should be between the shore and three miles out and outside the San Jaime Bank, all on the Pacific side and just outside the strongest current line. Guess what, that is the way it was!

BAIT: No change on the bait scene with Caballito and a small variety of other bait fish have been the normal $3 each and there are still no sardinas being found locally. Frozen Ballyhoo at $3 each has been available from some of the bait boats. Hopefully soon there will be Mackerel available, the water has to cool off a bit more though.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: Early in this reporting period the Striped Marlin bite was really, really good and almost everyone that wanted to catch one had a positive experience. It has tapered off a bit since then but should pick up soon as we go back into the full moon phase. There were scattered Sailfish being caught and early in the period there were scattered Blue Marlin as well. I had clients who released one about #350-400 and another around #200-250, both of them on the San Jaime Banks. Live bait was still the best way to get a Striped Marlin, dropping one back to fish that appear in the spread. The smaller Blue that my clients caught was on a live bait dropped back for a Dorado, dropped back behind one already hooked up. Imagine their surprise when the Blue appeared and ate the bait! A great fight on #30 tackle!

YELLOWFIN TUNA: As I mentioned in the last report, the super seiners were on top of the San Jaime Banks, and there were as many as seven of them at one time during the tuna tournament. That may have been, actually probably was, the reason there were only a few large Tuna caught during the tournament. Boats reported that the seiners were setting their nets right on top of the high spots in amongst the sport fishing fleet, helicopters flying overhead and chase boats working hard. The largest Tuna caught for the tournament was 210 pounds and we had expected there to be many of them over #200 caught based on the previous two weeks of fishing. Since then there have been mostly football sized fish caught, and then you had to find the right school of porpoise for that to happen. Boats and angles have reported seeing larger fish in the #100-#200 class breaking water in among the smaller fish, but they have been very spooky. The better Tuna fishing has been much farther offshore, many times as distant as 40 miles. Once in a while boats got lucky and found them 20 miles out but that was the exception. Also, contrary to normal, the best bites were on bright colored lures!

DORADO: Dorado were the charter fleet mainstay this period with most boats getting three to six nice Dorado per trip. Almost all the action has been withing three miles of the beach on the Pacific side or up around the Punta Gorda area and north of there on the Cortez side. As is common, boats with the best results were ones that dropped a live bait or belly strips behind a fish that was hooked on a lure. Patience was required, often slow trolling the live bait with the hooked Dorado for a half hour before more fish appeared. Using the first hooked fish as a teaser is one of the best ways to improve the catch!

WAHOO: This reporting period was during the new moon phase and there were some really nice Wahoo, as large as 55 pounds, caught by boats working the high spots and drop offs on the Pacific side specificly for them. Many boats reported getting bit by Wahoo but while fishing for Dorado using monofiliment leader, this resulted in many lost lures and not many fish!

INSHORE: Pangas fishing along the beach went mostly for the Dorado and had good success. Boats that fished this area also had some Wahoo bites. In among the rocks there were some decent Snapper on live bait and some Roosterfish in the #15 class. Using live bait also attracted Needlefish and they really took a toll on the bait count. A few small Yellowfin, some scattered Sierra and some Bonita rounded up the inshore action. Most of this took place on the Pacific side as well.

 

NOTES:

If you are planning on booking a fishing trip soon (or later in the year), contact me to see what I can set you up with. I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!

My music of the week is the album “Jazz Collectors Edition” with Dizzy Gillespie, Sarah Vaughan and Charlie Parker. Give it a listen, some great music here!

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

If you want to get the report every time I update, go to my blog at www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!

Meanwhile, Tight lines!

 

Advertisements

Cabo Fish Report Oct. 16 – 30, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Oct. 16 – 30, 2015

SYNOPSIS: Well, the big money Billfish tournaments are over and I am glad! I have caught up on my rest and now working hard on getting the “Susie Q” up and running for charters. In the past two weeks everything has changed a bit, and for the better for most of the species, and the weather changed, for the better as well. Check below for more details!

WEATHER: It was almost like someone threw the switch once again as the change was almost overnight. We went from nighttime lows in the mid 80’s to mid to low 70’s right around the 21st, and the daytime highs have dropped to the mid to high 80’s. If it was like this year round there would be too many people living here! The skies have remained clear with just a few clouds passing through. The wind has remained fairly consistent from the north-northwest on the Pacific side and from the north-northeast on the Cortez side, but you don’t really feel it there until you get up around the Punta Gorda area.

WATER: We had the passing of Hurricane Patricia to the south of us during this reporting period and while thankfully we had no winds from it (the strongest hurricane on record in the northern hemisphere according to NOAA) we did receive some big swells. These only lasted for a day, but were large enough that the Port Captain closed the port for a day. Other than that, the swells have pretty much remained at 3-5 feet on the Pacific side and 1-3 feet on the Cortez side of the peninsula. At the start of the report period the currents on the Cortez side were screaming from the north, then they slowed down and as of now they are picking up again but from the south. Water temperatures on the Cortez side remain higher than the Pacific with almost all the water showing 84 degrees and blue. On the Pacific side the 84 degree water extend about 10 miles offshore, then it drops down to the 82 degree range, and blue.

BAIT: Live bait has been a hit or miss proposition on some mornings but when available has been mostly Caballito at the normal $3 each. No Sardinas were found locally. Frozen local Ballyhoo (unbrined) has been available from some of the bait boats at the same $3 each, but you need to be careful as some has been thawed and refrozen, these are really too soft for anything but chum.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: I think that posting some quick numbers after breaking down the tournament results will be a good indicator of how the billfishing was, as of now the Blue and Black numbers has dropped off but the Sailfish remain the same and the Striped Marlin numbers have really picked up! For the first two tournaments (5 days fishing) there was an average of 1.04 billfish caught per boat day, these numbers included 2 Blacks, 30 Blues and 240 Striped Marlin. The third tournament was the Bisbee Black and Blue so only these fish counted, not Striped Marlin and the success rate for these bigger fish was much lower at .12 fish per boat day. There were not as many Stripers caught as most boats were running baits and lures too big for the Striped Marlin to eat, but there were many of them caught, just no records of how many. Since then the Striped Marlin bite has really picked up!

YELLOWFIN TUNA: We will keep our fingers crossed that the Tuna will stay for a while, at least through the Western Outdoors Tuna Jackpot next week. The fishing has been very good at the San Jaime Banks for all sizes of Yellowfin. Fish ranging in size from 5 pounds to 290 pounds have been caught. The larger fish have been a result of finding the fish on the depth sounder and dropping bait down to them and waiting for the bite. Smaller fish have been on hootchies on the surface. There was a short burst of commercial activity as three purse seiners worked that area for several days, but since these fish have not been associated with Dolphin or anything floating two of them moved on. The one that remained was brailing a mix of fish including Hammerhead Sharks, hopefully they will move on as well. Normally the fishing for big fish is good at the Gorda Banks but it has been slow there as the strong currents have pushed the bait off the high spots, if it slows down again perhaps the fishing there will improve.

DORADO: If I had written this report fours days ago thee would have been little change from the last report. Lucky for us the situation changed then and boats have been doing well on Dorado! It seems that around six weeks ago the fishing in San Diego went dead as the fish moved back toward us. It took six weeks to get to us and now you can see yellow Dorado flags flying everywhere you look as boats are catching two, three, four or more Dorado per trip. The nice thing is that these fish are nice sized ones, not the little shakers we were getting a few weeks back. The average size is around 12 pounds but many of them are in the 15-25 pound class and there are a few over 30 pounds as well! Most of the action for these has been on the Pacific side within 10 miles of the beach, in that warmer 84 degree water. For the best results the first fish caught has been left in the water to attract others in the school, and dropping a live bait behind that one resulted in multiple hook-ups for many boats.

WAHOO: Wahoo are being caught as I write this, and it should remain fair to good as we move off of the full moon over the next several days. Most of the fish are being found in the usual areas, high spots offshore and drop offs and points next to the beach. These toothy guys have been ranging in size from 12 pounds to 30+ pounds and a lot of lures have been lost to them! When the bite is on it pays to change to wire if you don’t want to loose the lures, but the fish don’t seem to bite as well with the wire. Pulling lures at a slightly higher speed than normal, up to 10 knots, covers more area and once you get bit you need to work it hard for more!

INSHORE: With no change, inshore continues to consist of Bonito and small Yellowfin and you really have to chum to get them to start going, the problem was it was very difficult to get sardines to do this so many boats had to resort to chunking slabs of frozen squid or skipjack caught while trolling. The earlier you got out the better the action and most of it was in about 120 feet of water. Scattered Grouper, Snapper, Amberjack and Trigger fish rounded out the action.

NOTES: Hopefully in mid November I will be running a 35′ Luhrs, named the “Susie Q”. We are in the process of updating and repair which should be done in four more weeks or less, and once the paperwork is done it will be available for charter with me as the Captain. When it happens I will post pictures of the boat and rates.

If you are planning on booking a fishing trip soon (or later in the year), contact me to see what I can set you up with. I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!

My music of the week is the album “Live in Amsterdam” with Joe Bonamassa and Beth Hart. You want some blues? It does not get much better than this!

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

If you want to get the report every week, go to my blog at www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!

421.5 tuna cabo sept 19Meanwhile, Tight lines!

Cabo fish report for Oct. 21 through Nov. 32013

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com

www.flyhooker.com

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

October 21 – Nov. 3, 2013

It seems I have to apologize again as it has been two weeks instead of one since my last report. In my defense, I left the morning after the Bisbee Black and Blue Tournament for Ensenada to bring a boat with the owner and friends down to Cabo and had little time to write.  So, you get this report instead.  We had people fishing this past week so I will use their information as well as what I have been told by other anglers and Captains as the basis for the information on this past weeks fishing, and my own time on the water during tournament week for that time frame.  I may mention at times as well the experiences we had on the trip down.

WEATHER:  I truly don’t think the weather could have been much better during the Bisbee tournament week.  We had mostly clear skies, evening lows in the low to mid 70’s and daytime highs in the mid 80’s.  The winds we experienced were light and variable on the Cortez side of the Cape and light at 4-10 knots on the Pacific side.  Add in the small swells and it was really nice.  This most recent week showed a bit of a change as a deck of clouds moved in as Hurricane Raymond passed well to the south and west of us, leaving trailing remnants to bring a bit of humidity back in our lives.  Daytime highs reached the low 90’s while nighttime lows were in the mid to high 70’s and it was humid, a bit more like summertime.  The cloud cover broke at the end of the week and it again became nice and sunny.  We won’t be seeing a lot of that this week though, at least at the beginning, as Tropical Storm Sonia begins her approach to the mainland.  She is expected to pass to the south of us this evening and tonight and has a very large deck of clouds, some of them with plenty of rain.  At this time she is 250 miles to the south and expected to pass within 150 miles as she turns to the east and makes landfall on the mainland. During our trip down from Ensenada we had wonderful weather with the exception on Wednesday.  Early in the morning as we were at anchor in Magdalena Bay the wind picked up to around 25knots as had been expected and we spend all day watching movies and eating.  Thursday we went out again and had fairly smooth going until approaching Lusitania Banks in the evening and the winds picked up again, knocking us around a bit until we came to the lee of the Peninsula around midnight. Friday morning as we set lines at first light on Golden Gate Banks it was glassy and remained that way until arriving at Puerto Los Cabos in the late afternoon.

WATER: The seas never did build up from any of the storms that passed us, at least it did not develop any short, close together sets that make for uncomfortable rides.  The item of most importance in anglers mind, at least for the first week was the water temperature and the clarity. Both these can be very important in a tournament, so everyone was watching changes closely.  For the tournament we were seeing the water on the Cortez side of the cape being in the 84-85 degree range, with a bit of mixing and off-color to it.  Directly south of us, and running basicly in an east-west direction along the 1,000 fathom line was a slightly cleaner demarcation, with the water a degree cooler and cleaner to the south.  Once reaching the San Jaime Banks this line ran more toward the northwest.  Inside along shore on the Pacific side, as well as on the Cortez side along the Punta Gorda area the water was more off-colored with a heavier tinge of green. This week the average water temperature dropped at least two degrees on the Pacific side as we were reading water between 80.5 and 82.7 degrees on Friday, and the water was a very clean blue.  Throughout the past two weeks surface conditions were fine, with only some surface chop the middle of the second week as remnants of Raymond moved past.

BAIT: Caballito, and frozen Ballyhoo could be had for $3 each this week, and there were actually a few mackerel to be had as well.  Sardines were just a bit easier to find, but still not readily available.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: Once again telling the results of the Bisbee Black and Blue Marlin Tournament may be one of the best ways of showing accurate catch statistics, at least for the Black and Blue Marlin.  Striped Marlin did not count in this tournament, so most of these hooked up were not reported in on the radio if it was immediately obvious what the fish was.  Based on our personal experience, I would hazard a guess that there were about twice the numbers of Striped Marlin hooked up as there were Blues or Blacks.  The first day of the Tournament there were no qualifying fish brought to the scale (#300 or larger to qualify), there were 12 Blue Marlin caught with a #290 brought to the scales, the rest released, and one Black Marlin released.  On day two things improved a bit as 21 Blue Marlin were caught with two brought to the scales, one of them underweight but the boat “Retriever” with owner/angler Martha Macnab weighing a 525 pound Blue Marlin, and one Black Marlin released.  The catch improved yet again on day three with 25 Blue Marlin caught with nine brought to the scales and one Black Marlin released..   Four of these were qualifiers, the largest of the tournament was caught this day and with angler Linda Williams in the chair and Captain Kevin Pahl on the helm, “Team II Success” captured the largest fish of the tournament with a 774 pound Blue Marlin. The top release team was a 56′ Beneteue Sailboat, the “Titan” with three releases.  One very interesting thing about this tournament, if you care to look, is the fact that the top two fish were caught by female anglers, and the fishing cockpit of the top release team was run by a female angler!  With a total of 61 Blues and Blacks caught there had to be well over 150 Striped Marlin as well.  On a side note, the last day of our delivery we put lines in on the Golden Gate Bank at first gray light and less than five minutes later hooked up, fought and then released a Blue Marlin we estimated at 250 pounds.  Later in the day we were south of the San Jaime Bank along the 1,000 fathom line and managed to catch two more, one estimated at 300 pounds and the other at 250 pounds, lost a large fish after a giant first run estimated at 500 pounds and missed another Blue Marlin Bite.  The fish are still out there, at least the Blue Marlin offshore, and I heard on the radio that there were plenty of Striped Marlin to be found just off the beach on the Pacific side. We spotted several areas with Frigate birds working small bait balls offshore, and there were Striped Marlin working on these.  Up outside of Magdalena Bay boats were working Frigate birds and releasing double digit numbers every day.

YELLOWFIN TUNA: Yellowfin Tuna have been the disappointment of the past two weeks.  There have been a few large fish found, but not in any numbers and there has been no real concentration of fish in any one area.  There have been quite a few football fish in the 10-15 pound class found under porpoise, but again, these have been scattered and moving around a lot, so it has been difficult for the boats to pinpoint them on a daily basis.  This does not bode real well for the upcoming Western Outdoor News Tuna Shootout (fishing November 7 and 8, entry fee $800) unless there is a drastic change. Of course there will be large fish brought in, but probably not in the numbers we have seen in the past.  Maybe the passing of Tropical Storm Sonia will bring about a change?  Lets keep our fingers crossed!

 

 

DORADO: Sometimes you just cannot appreciate what you have until it is gone.  The fishing for Dorado continued to be great for the past two weeks with plenty of fish to be found along the Pacific coastline between the lighthouse and the Gaspirino area up around Todo Santos.  The majority of the fish were between the beach and three miles offshore, with most of them found within two miles of the beach.  We really missed the action on the fish on the trip down from Ensenada, as they can provide steady excitement when they are biting.  Most of the boats that focused on the Dorado (and that was the majority of the charters these past two weeks) were able to post limits of two fish per angler, then go search for other species.

WAHOO:  Sparse, but there, were the reports I received from both anglers and Captains upon my return Saturday. It seems that there have been Wahoo caught every day, but no large numbers in any one area, more of a lucky thing than anything else. Well, with the exception of a couple of private boats that focus on these fish and were able to get daily action up in the Gorda Banks, Punta Gorda area.

INSHORE: Things inshore are changing to wintertime mode, but slowly, as we are starting to see a few more Sierra and small Yellowtail every week.  With the Dorado action being so good just off the beach, there has not been much in the way of effort next to the beach so it is hard to tell exactly what is there, but reports from a few of the Panga captains I know show that there are still small Roosterfish (less than 5 pounds) and a scattering of Amberjack and Snapper.

FISH RECIPE:  You can mix and match spices and additional herbs to your hearts content, but it is hard to beat a simple grilled fish meal.  The fish is showcased when you keep it simple, and when the fish is as fresh as we get it here it is just about the only way to go.  There does come a time though when you are dealing with fish that has been frozen.  You have returned home and that Tuna, Dorado or Wahoo you caught on your fishing trip needs to be used, it just stares up at you from the freezer, saying “eat me, choose me for dinner”.  This is when those slightly more complicated recipes come in handy.  I have to say in the attempt at full disclosure that very few of the recipes I post here are my own, except for the simple ones.  I try to give credit where it is due, and the following is the direct result of reading a cookbook by Sam Choy and has become one of my favorites.  My cholesterol level goes up just from reading it, but here goes,

Take four 8 oz Wahoo or Dorado fillets and slice a pocket in the side of each one, almost all the way through. Mix some softened butter with minced fresh parsley to form four butter logs the size of your finger and put them in the freezer.  One of these will go in each of the pockets you just cut in the fillets. Mince 8 oz of Macadamia nuts, mince them very finely, they are going to crust the fillets.  Dredge the fillets (after placing the butter logs inside) through flour, then whipped eggs, then through the minced Macadamia nuts and lightly brown both sides in a skillet or pan set at medium high.  Have the oven pre-heated to 350 degrees and once the fillets are browned, place them in a glass pan that has been rubbed with butter and place them in the oven for about 15 minutes. For a sauce, take two Mangos and dice one of them fine, place the other in a blender (after removing the seed and skin of course) along with an ounce or two of fresh parsley and chop/blend/pulse the mix with a bit of white vinegar and some sugar (both to taste).  Heat this mix until it has simmered several minutes than add the diced Mango.  Pour equal amounts on each of four plates, place the cooked fish fillets on the sauce and a healthy scoop of rice on the side and you are done!

NOTES: As I was writing this report we received our first rain from Tropical Storm Sonia.  Not a lot, but a promise of things to come.  There is still no wind and we don’t really expect to get any until this evening.  As you can tell, I got a bit wordy on this report, having a lot to say about the fishing and my trip, just be glad I am not writing on other things, I might have bleeding fingertips by the time I was done!  Our trip down the coast was great, with some wonderful people on board the 51′ Rivera “High Bid”.  A new boat for the owner, but one I have delivered before under a different boat name, it has been updated and upgraded to perfection.  We had no issues mechanically and had firsts for the new name with first Dorado, first Striped Marlin, first Blue Marlin, first Wahoo, first Spotted Bay Bass (a Mag Bay specialty).  My thanks and appreciation to new owners Carl and Sally, and guests Rick, Dave, Leo and Frank.  Most of all to my deckhand Carlos who somehow was able to make everyone happy while living in tight quarters.  Until next week, tight lines!

 

And as always, George writes this report
and posts to the blog on Sunday morning.  So if you
can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW”  on the top of the blog
page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

 

Cabo Fish Report: UPDATE on Weather section

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
November 5 – 11, 2012

WEATHER: I love this time of the year in Cabo. We get the nice cool evenings when the temperature is right around 80 degrees, mornings with a slight chill with low 70’s and daytime where you can warm up a bit in the low 90’s. No sweaters needed at night, but no air conditioning either! This week we had mostly sunny days with light clouds for most of the week. The winds were light except on Saturday when they freshened up a bit, but they never got strong.
WATER: On the Cortez side of the Cape this week we were seeing water from the beach out to the 1,000 fathom line showing 82.4 to 84.4 degrees while just past this area the water warmed up to the mid 85 degree range and did touch 86 degrees in a few areas. The water was mostly clean and blue with a few of the area in cooler water showing a touch of green, but nothing easy to notice. Add in the flat water with little wind and no swells to speak of and it was like being on a pool table. On the Pacific side it was 81 to 83 degrees all along the coast line from the beach out past the banks. The water was clean and blue with small swells and almost no wind most days. It did blow a bit on Saturday but not hard enough or long enough to get the swells up, just a bit of chop. UPDATE 11/11/12: The wind yesterday continued to blow the rest of the day and increased over the night. We went to the Pacific side this morning and only made it half way past the lighthouse to the Los Arcos area before turning back. Swells had picked up to 4-6 feet with the wind at 15-20 knots. Boats running the beach made it farther up, avoiding the wind chop and current lines, but I can’t imagine that the water conditions off the beach were much better. Wind is supposed to lay down to 8-10 knots tomorrow, and like today from the NNW.
BAIT: Same as last week, Caballito and Mullet could be had at $3 each. Once the water cools a few more degrees there should be a few Mackerel showing up as well. There were Sardinas at $25 a bucket and plenty of them as boats were supplying enough for the Tuna Tournament. You could get frozen horse Bally-hoo at $3 each.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: I heard of no reports I could verify of any Blue or Black Marlin this week, and I spent two days with a friend looking for only those fish while the W.O.N. Tuna tournament was going on. There were some Striped Marlin caught, but almost all were on the Pacific side, close to the beach. A few boats were dropping live bait down halfway to the bottom or all the way to the bottom and getting a few hook-ups, and there were a few fish spotted tailing that were willing to eat a live bait. Just as last week, I estimate that about 20% or fewer of the boats were able to catch a Striped Marlin this week. There were also few Sailfish, though a couple were caught, and they were found on the Cortez side in the warmer water.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: Fish of the week! The only reason they have edged out the Dorado is the number of boats that were targeting them this week. Thursday and Friday were the two fishing days for the Yamaha/Western Outdoor News Tuna Tournament and with 121 teams entered the pressure to find a big fish was heavy. Since practically the only area that has been producing any Yellowfin fish of quality has been the Gordo Banks, my friend Mike of”Renegade Mike” told me it was almost a parking lot with over 70 boats positioned on and around the area on the first day. The pressure was too much for some of the boats on the second day so they left and targeted Dorado and Wahoo instead. The results were impressive with the largest fish caught being 372 pounds! Mike caught the largest Tuna of day one with a #266 and ended up taking second overall along with a fish that would have been fourth place if the money had paid out that far. There were a dozen fish over 200 pounds caught during the tournament, and all but one came from the Gordo area. The tournament has no idea of the numbers of smaller fish but there were plenty of them! Most of these fish were taken by boats that were chunking bonito or chumming with Sardinas, and you were not getting bit if you did not have flouro-carbon leader, the fish were very shy. The only other area that produced Yellowfin was a school on the second day approximately 12 miles to the north of the Golden Gate Bank. I only saw 6 boats working this school, four of them flying kites, but one of the 200+ pound fish was caught from this school.

DORADO: I think the results of the Tuna tournament speak of the Dorado fishing as far as size goes as there were no Dorado weighed over 30 pounds, even with $78,000 U.S. on the line the second day. But there were lot’s of them out there! Almost all the action was on the Pacific side between the Los Arcos area all the way to Todo Santos. Fishing within two miles of the beach using drifted or slow trolled live bait, or fishing a spread of lures, every boat that tried was able to limit out on fish that ran from 10 to 20 pounds with a few to 25 pounds. As usual, getting the first one hooked up and leaving it in the water behind the boat resulted in more fish coming in and better catches. With most of the boats on the first day concentrating on Yellowfin the pressure on the Dorado was light, but on the second day of the tournament it picked up a bit. Now that the tournament is over you can expect the pressure on the Dorado to return as they are the base of the charter operations this time of year.
WAHOO: Once again Wahoo action was sporadic with quite a few small fish caught and no really large ones. The action was spread out all over the place with fish being caught around the Punta Gordo area and up off of Todo Santos. Looking for them along the 50 fathom line or closer in resulted in fish that were in the 20 pound class. The largest one weighed in during the Tuna tournament was only #30.4 and ended up taking the $78,000 prize in the Wahoo/Dorado category. My math makes that fish worth $2,565.78 a pound!
INSHORE: There was no change in the inshore fishing report for this week . You can almost consider the Yellowfin, Skipjack and Dorado bite as inshore fishing since the main concentration was in less than 300 feet of water, and since it has been so good, few of the Pangas did any fishing right on the beach. Those that did found a few smaller sized Roosterfish, plenty of Needle-fish, a scattering of Jack Crevalle but not a lot of anything else. I did hear of a few Sierra being caught, but not any large numbers.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe! A really good one for Dorado!
NOTES: The tournaments are now over and it is time to settle in for the season. It appears as if both the Tuna and Dorado may be here for a little while longer, at least for the next month or so. Hopefully the Striped Marlin bite will turn on soon. When we start to see more Mackerel in the bait supplies there should be more Striped Marlin showing. Remember, all I do is fishing (with a bit of golf thrown in) so you get a no non-sense, factual report on our conditions every week, and most of the time I have been on the water a day or two myself. I have had a few questions about how I get my information, and after 13 years here I have an amazing number of phone numbers that I work every week, besides by own experience. Combine the calls I make to Captains, I talk to great numbers of anglers, both clients and non-clients to find out how they did and where they went. This weeks report was written to the music of Brian Flynn once again as I am looking forward to his bands concert this Sunday at the outdoor amphitheater in the new cultural center. (Brian has played with Carlos Santana, Jeff Beck, Loverboy, Ralph Dinosaur, The Marshall Tucker Band, Molly Hatchett, Southern Rock Allstars and Guess Who). Looking forward to it! Until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
November 5 – 11, 2012

WEATHER: I love this time of the year in Cabo. We get the nice cool evenings when the temperature is right around 80 degrees, mornings with a slight chill with low 70’s and daytime where you can warm up a bit in the low 90’s. No sweaters needed at night, but no air conditioning either! This week we had mostly sunny days with light clouds for most of the week. The winds were light except on Saturday when they freshened up a bit, but they never got strong.
WATER: On the Cortez side of the Cape this week we were seeing water from the beach out to the 1,000 fathom line showing 82.4 to 84.4 degrees while just past this area the water warmed up to the mid 85 degree range and did touch 86 degrees in a few areas. The water was mostly clean and blue with a few of the area in cooler water showing a touch of green, but nothing easy to notice. Add in the flat water with little wind and no swells to speak of and it was like being on a pool table. On the Pacific side it was 81 to 83 degrees all along the coast line from the beach out past the banks. The water was clean and blue with small swells and almost no wind most days. It did blow a bit on Saturday but not hard enough or long enough to get the swells up, just a bit of chop.
BAIT: Same as last week, Caballito and Mullet could be had at $3 each. Once the water cools a few more degrees there should be a few Mackerel showing up as well. There were Sardinas at $25 a bucket and plenty of them as boats were supplying enough for the Tuna Tournament. You could get frozen horse Bally-hoo at $3 each.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: I heard of no reports I could verify of any Blue or Black Marlin this week, and I spent two days with a friend looking for only those fish while the W.O.N. Tuna tournament was going on. There were some Striped Marlin caught, but almost all were on the Pacific side, close to the beach. A few boats were dropping live bait down halfway to the bottom or all the way to the bottom and getting a few hook-ups, and there were a few fish spotted tailing that were willing to eat a live bait. Just as last week, I estimate that about 20% or fewer of the boats were able to catch a Striped Marlin this week. There were also few Sailfish, though a couple were caught, and they were found on the Cortez side in the warmer water.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: Fish of the week! The only reason they have edged out the Dorado is the number of boats that were targeting them this week. Thursday and Friday were the two fishing days for the Yamaha/Western Outdoor News Tuna Tournament and with 121 teams entered the pressure to find a big fish was heavy. Since practically the only area that has been producing any Yellowfin fish of quality has been the Gordo Banks, my friend Mike of”Renegade Mike” told me it was almost a parking lot with over 70 boats positioned on and around the area on the first day. The pressure was too much for some of the boats on the second day so they left and targeted Dorado and Wahoo instead. The results were impressive with the largest fish caught being 372 pounds! Mike caught the largest Tuna of day one with a #266 and ended up taking second overall along with a fish that would have been fourth place if the money had paid out that far. There were a dozen fish over 200 pounds caught during the tournament, and all but one came from the Gordo area. The tournament has no idea of the numbers of smaller fish but there were plenty of them! Most of these fish were taken by boats that were chunking bonito or chumming with Sardinas, and you were not getting bit if you did not have flouro-carbon leader, the fish were very shy. The only other area that produced Yellowfin was a school on the second day approximately 12 miles to the north of the Golden Gate Bank. I only saw 6 boats working this school, four of them flying kites, but one of the 200+ pound fish was caught from this school.

DORADO: I think the results of the Tuna tournament speak of the Dorado fishing as far as size goes as there were no Dorado weighed over 30 pounds, even with $78,000 U.S. on the line the second day. But there were lot’s of them out there! Almost all the action was on the Pacific side between the Los Arcos area all the way to Todo Santos. Fishing within two miles of the beach using drifted or slow trolled live bait, or fishing a spread of lures, every boat that tried was able to limit out on fish that ran from 10 to 20 pounds with a few to 25 pounds. As usual, getting the first one hooked up and leaving it in the water behind the boat resulted in more fish coming in and better catches. With most of the boats on the first day concentrating on Yellowfin the pressure on the Dorado was light, but on the second day of the tournament it picked up a bit. Now that the tournament is over you can expect the pressure on the Dorado to return as they are the base of the charter operations this time of year.
WAHOO: Once again Wahoo action was sporadic with quite a few small fish caught and no really large ones. The action was spread out all over the place with fish being caught around the Punta Gordo area and up off of Todo Santos. Looking for them along the 50 fathom line or closer in resulted in fish that were in the 20 pound class. The largest one weighed in during the Tuna tournament was only #30.4 and ended up taking the $78,000 prize in the Wahoo/Dorado category. My math makes that fish worth $2,565.78 a pound!
INSHORE: There was no change in the inshore fishing report for this week . You can almost consider the Yellowfin, Skipjack and Dorado bite as inshore fishing since the main concentration was in less than 300 feet of water, and since it has been so good, few of the Pangas did any fishing right on the beach. Those that did found a few smaller sized Roosterfish, plenty of Needle-fish, a scattering of Jack Crevalle but not a lot of anything else. I did hear of a few Sierra being caught, but not any large numbers.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe! A really good one for Dorado!
NOTES: The tournaments are now over and it is time to settle in for the season. It appears as if both the Tuna and Dorado may be here for a little while longer, at least for the next month or so. Hopefully the Striped Marlin bite will turn on soon. When we start to see more Mackerel in the bait supplies there should be more Striped Marlin showing. Remember, all I do is fishing (with a bit of golf thrown in) so you get a no non-sense, factual report on our conditions every week, and most of the time I have been on the water a day or two myself. I have had a few questions about how I get my information, and after 13 years here I have an amazing number of phone numbers that I work every week, besides by own experience. Combine the calls I make to Captains, I talk to great numbers of anglers, both clients and non-clients to find out how they did and where they went. This weeks report was written to the music of Brian Flynn once again as I am looking forward to his bands concert this Sunday at the outdoor amphitheater in the new cultural center. (Brian has played with Carlos Santana, Jeff Beck, Loverboy, Ralph Dinosaur, The Marshall Tucker Band, Molly Hatchett, Southern Rock Allstars and Guess Who). Looking forward to it! Until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
October 29-November 4, 2012

WEATHER: It was a pleasure this week to be out and about in Cabo as our daytime highs never seemed to top the mid 90’s. That was the middle of the day and even then there was so little humidity it did not feel hot. At night we got into the mid 70’s, not cool enough for a sweater but perfect for walking around. As a matter of fact, this week was perfect for hanging at the beach, getting out on the golf course or spending time on the water. With clear skies all week long plenty of visitors were able to work on their tans as well.
WATER: The Pacific side of the Cape had swells at 2-5 feet all week long, and with light breezes from the northwest most of the week there was some slight chop late in the day, but never anything uncomfortable. The water between San Jaime and Golden Gate Banks averaged 82 degrees while the water right along the beach was several degrees warmer. On the Cortez side the water was several degrees warmer at 85 degrees at the beginning of the week and dropping an average of ½ to 1 degree at the end of the week. With swells at small to non-existent the water was almost like glass with light wind riffles until Saturday. On Saturday the wind changed direction and started coming from the East. This gave a bit of chop to the water but with the small swells it was nothing to worry about. As the week went on the currents pushed the warmer water from the Cortez side across the tip of the Cape and it’s influence was starting to be felt directly off of the Cape, which had been a continuation of the Pacific side early in the week.
BAIT: Caballito and Mullet could be had at $3 each, but the number of Mullet seem to be dropping off. Once the water cools a few more degrees there should be a few Mackerel showing up as well. There were Sardinas at $25 a bucket and you could get frozen horse Bally-hoo at $3 each.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: The number of Striped Marlin caught this week was not impressive, my guess is that about 20% of the boats managed to get a billfish. A few boats managed to get their anglers into two fish, but they were the exception. Most of the action seemed to happen on the Pacific side right in the transition zone between the warm and slightly cooler water off of the beach, but there were also fish found on the Cortez side at the 95 Spot and the 1150, though those fish were more likely to just look at a lure or bait than eat. There are still a few Sailfish around as well, but once again they are not in the numbers we were seeing a month ago. I did not hear of any large Blue or Black Marlin being caught this week, but there were several small ones reported released, and I did see several small Blues brought into the main dock area.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: There has been a very good bite on football sized Yellowfin tuna from 8 to 15 pounds near shore between Grey Rock and Palmilla this week. These Yellowfin are mixed in with “White” Skipjack in the same size range and have offered anglers great action all morning long as long as the Sardinas chum lasts. With these Skipjack being good eating, unlike the “Black” Skipjack (with the three black spots at the base of the pectoral fin) there has been plenty of good eating fish available. For larger Yellowfin almost the only other option was working the grounds at the Gorda Banks. There were not a large number of fish caught every day, but there were quality fish. Putting in the time while drifting live baits or slow trolling a down-rigger or chunking cut bait and Sardinas sometimes resulted in a cow Yellowfin over 200 pounds. Offshore the action was extremely slow as the pods of porpoise that were found tended not to have any fish associated with them. There were a few exceptions, but the fish were not large ones, mainly in the 20-30 pound class. I guess you can figure out where most of the boats in this weeks Tuna tournament are going to be fishing, huh?

DORADO: Good one week and not the next, then good again, what can we say? The Dorado action this week was very good with almost everyone wanting them coming in with limits. There was a lot of consistent, but scattered action along the Pacific coastline as boats worked their way from the arch all the way to Todo Santos. One fish here, two fish there, and so on until a limit was had. A few boats were able to find floating debris offshore and filled limits working one spot, but most boats on the Pacific had to cover ground. On the Cortez side, boats that were working the Yellowfin and Skipjack just off the beach also had some good Dorado action as the chumming attracted these fish as well. It seems that the fish found on the Pacific side were slightly larger averaging 15 pounds while the fish with the tuna were averaging 10 pounds.
WAHOO: Wahoo action was sporadic this week, unlike the action last week. A few fish were caught, and the heavy chumming by boats fishing tuna brought Wahoo as well as the Dorado into the area. There were a few baits cut off that the anglers never knew had been touched as the razor toothed fish swiftly sliced through the light mono leader, but still a few were landed. Boats trolling Rapallas and Marauders did fair as they worked the drop-offs along the beach and pulled them over the high spots, but a lot of time was spent for just a few fish overall.
INSHORE: You can almost consider the Yellowfin, Skipjack and Dorado bite as inshore fishing since the main concentration was in less than 300 feet of water, and since it has been so good, few of the Pangas did any fishing right on the beach. Those that did found a few smaller sized Roosterfish, plenty of Needle-fish, a scattering of Jack Crevalle but not a lot of anything else. I did hear of a few Sierra being caught, but not any large numbers.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe!
NOTES: The big news this week is the Yamaha/Western Outdoor News Tuna Tournament. It is only $800 to enter so it is affordable to everyone, which has made it known as the Blue-Collar or Working Mans tournament. There are jackpots, drawings, prizes and parties galore. Registration is on Wednesday with the fishing taking place on Thursday and Friday with the awards ceremony on Saturday. You can get more information at the official website, http://www.loscabostunajackpot.com. It makes for a hectic week, and it’s lots of fun. I have know teams to put together enough money to enter and never fish or plan to fish, they just want a chance to win the prizes and attend the parties! I will give the results in next weeks report if you want to check it out. This weeks report was written to the music of violinist Alex Dupue and guitarist Miguel De Hoyos on their album “Underground Whispers in A”. Google these guys and check out the music! Until next week, tight lines!

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
October 23 – 28, 2012

WEATHER: I really don’t know what to say except to mention what a great pleasure it has been to once again get through the heat and humidity that summer time brings to us here in the southern part of the Baja Peninsula. When our nighttime lows stay in the mid 70’s and the daytime highs stay in the low 90’s it is about as good as it gets, compared to what we had for the past three months. In another few months we will be even cooler as the temperature at night drops to the low 60’s, but this weather I would prefer to have year round! We had very light clouds this week and while the beginning of the week started off a bit windy, by the end of the week we were experiencing just light breezes. The week started with moderate winds from the northwest, picking up in the afternoon, and ended with light breezes from the northeast in the morning, dying to nothing in the afternoon.
WATER: On the Sea of Cortez side of the Cape we had water at 84-85 degrees inside the 1,000 fathom line most of the week, with the exception on Friday when a hot spot of 87 degree water formed across the 1150 to the 95 spot and out to the 1,000 fathom line. For most of the week there was a good temperature break at the 1,000 fathom line as well with the water to the northeast being 2 degrees warmer than the water to the southwest. Surface conditions on the Cortez side were great all week as well with swells at 2-4 feet early in the week and dropping to 1-3 feet later in the week. On the Pacific side we were seeing the water between the San Jaime and the Golden Gate Banks at 84-85 degrees with swells at 3-6 feet early in the week and dropping to 2-4 feet later in the week. In between the Cortez and the Pacific we had a late intrusion of cooler water at 82-83 degrees, coming in to almost three miles of the arch. The water was slightly cleaner on the Pacific side than it was on the Cortez side this week.
BAIT: Same bait report as last week. Sardines could be had here in Cabo this week, probably due to the demand of the tournament boats who use them to catch skip jack and small Yellowfin for bait. A scooped bucket would set you back $25, but they were in much better shape than the Sardines we were getting earlier in the week from bait boats farther north. Caballito and Mullet could be had easily at $3 each, and there were frozen Bally-hoo for $3 each.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: Our big money Marlin tournament season is over now that the Bisbee Black and Blue is finished, at least the tournaments for big Marlin. Next week is a small tournament with the Trip Advisor website members, then the W.O.N. Tuna tournament in November. Next year we will see more tournaments that focus on Striped Marlin in the Spring. Statistics can do funny things to your thinking, and as I did last week in the report, this week I am going to lay a few more on you, based on the three day Black and Blue tournament that just finished. There was 106 teams fishing three days for 318 boat days on the water, with big Marlin as the focus. There were 67 billfish caught, 1 Spearfish, 4 Sailfish, 4 Black Marlin, 19 Blue Marlin and 39 Striped Marlin. Based on this, it took 4.75 boat days to get a Marlin this week. Pretty sad stats, and when there was only one Marlin caught over 300 pounds it almost makes me cry. (The team that caught the 2.4 million dollar fish is not crying!) Once again I have to remind you that the stats for normal charters would be much better as the focus for most of the boats in the tournament was big Blue or Black Marlin over 300 pounds, or numbers of smaller sized Blues or Blacks. None of these boats focused on Striped Marlin, which is the most common species here, as evidenced by the comparative number caught during the Tournament. In conclusion, while the possibility of getting a Blue or Black to the boat was fairly small, the chances of hooking into a Striped Marlin, if you focused on that, was fairly good, probably at twice the rate of the Marlin hook-ups experienced by the tournament anglers.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: With the Black and Blue Tournament going on, and since Tuna did not count in any category, the pressure on the Tuna was pretty slack. Not that there were many out there, but those that were caught were pretty decent fish. There were scattered pods of Dolphin to the south 30 miles and to the west the same distance, and some of these pods produced a few Yellowfin to 35 pounds, but once again the focus for big fish was on the Gorda Banks area. Charter boats drifting, slow trolling or flying live bait off of kites were getting the occasional bite from fish that occasionally exceeded 300 pounds (314 for one boat) but most of them were between 100 and 200 pounds. It took a while, you had to have patience. One of our friends worked the area for two days and managed to get a nice 158 pound fish.

DORADO: The Dorado bite experienced a sudden drop this week and I am not sure why. Plenty of charters were working both the inside and the outside area of the Pacific coastline and most were lucky to get three or four fish, there were no really large concentrations found. Boats that did well were ones that were willing to lose their first fish to get more. Leaving that first fish in the water and slow trolling it 30 feet behind the boat until more fish appeared was the trick, and it works much of the time. We had one fly-fishing client this week who did very well, it’s often hard to get enough shots at a fish on the fly rod, but if your target is Dorado, this method as well as heavily chumming with Sardines works very well. On the Cortez side there were Dorado appearing in fair numbers off of the Cabo Del Sol area as tournament boats were heavily chumming the area early in the morning attempting to get those big Skipjack for live bait. With 30 or 40 boats tossing Sardinia in the water the Dorado came in and there were quite a few caught. I didn’t see any really large Dorado come in, or hear of any large ones, most of the fish were between 10 and 15 pounds, but there were a couple of big fish caught by tournament boats, at least I assume they were big as the teams reported the hook-ups on the radio before reporting them as non-qualifying species.
WAHOO: The full moon did produce more Wahoo than were caught last week. During the tournament our team caught a 60 pound fish the first day. While not worth any money in the tournament, it sure was good to eat! Other boats reported hooking up Wahoo as well, and there were a decent number caught by the charter fleet. I did hear of one boat getting two 30 pound fish one day. The action on these fish was scattered and not concentrated in any one area.
INSHORE: The slow down in the Dorado bite had many of the panga anglers crying this week. Last week was absolutely great, but there was a dearth of action off the beach this week. One of the saving graces was that area off of Cabo Real early in the morning as the numbers of white Skipjack and scattered Dorado at least produced action. For the normal inshore species such as Roosterfish, Jacks, Grouper and Snapper, the action was slow as well. Fishing on the Cortez side of the Cape just off the beach produced most of the action as this was the side of the Cape that was holding the Sardinia schools.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe!
NOTES: In a couple of days I am going to produce a short blog with some number crunching concerning the tournaments we have just had, so check it out. I had a great time fishing this week, just wish our team, “Sporty Game” had gotten our big bite on Thursday hooked up. Oh well, next year! We did get that nice Wahoo as well as a Dorado while bait fishing, so there were fish in the boat, just not the right kind. I would like to thank Mary for keeping the blog updated with the tournament results while I was out fishing, great job honey! Also, a big thank you to Mark Bailey for turning me on to the group “Two Tons of Steel”, this is the first time I had heard of them. Based out of San Antonio, they are described as a “rockabilly” group. However you want to describe them, they are fun to listen to! Until next week, tight lines! Oh, don’t forget that Cabo has changed their time already, last night we set our clock back when we went to sleep. This is one week earlier than in the states, so don’t get confused when you get down here!