Cabo Fish Report June 3 – 9, 2016

IMG00076-20121009-1357.jpgFLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

June 3 – 9, 2016

SYNOPSIS: It has been two months since my last report as we had seen very little change in conditions until recently. Several weeks ago things began to improve as the water began to change a little and now we have experienced decent fishing for the past two weeks, with fingers crossed it will be even better! Striped Marlin to the southeast and easterly, Tuna out front and to the west, Dorado and Wahoo scattered closer to the beach and some good Roosterfishing along the coast line. Check below for a few more details!

WEATHER: This morning it was 67 degrees at 6 am, three days ago it was 79 degrees and everyone was shopping for new floor fans! We have clear mostly cloud-free skies at the moment but just experienced three days of cloud cover. No rain and the breezes have been picking up a bit in the evening. During our week of warm weather the winds appeared from the south, coming off the warmer water down there, more recently the cooler winds have started in again from the northwest, again from the cool water to the north.

WATER: As of today we were seeing cool, almost cold water along the beach, the temperatures were ranging from 68 to 70 degrees with the cooler water on the Pacific side. Last week these waters were in the 70 – 77 degree range. Once you get offshore around 10 or more miles the water warms up to 74 degrees, last week we were seeing the temperature around 77 degrees. The water overall is an off-blue color with currents now coming up from the south. Wind chop on top of three to five foot swells on the Pacific side made fishing to the west and south uncomfortable for some people, but for those who did not mind getting a bit wet, the fishing was worth it. The water conditions on the Sea of Cortez side were much better than on the Pacific, but well offshore there were still some large swells wrapping around the Cape.

BAIT: The bait availability has been on and off, with a variety of live baits but no one species except Caballito in abundance. There have been a few Mackerel, Look-downs, grunts, green jacks and little pompano, no Sardinas that I heard of. The live baits have been the normal $3 each, and many of the boats have been using (or at least taking) frozen ballyhoo in order to be sure of having something fishy to use!

FISHING:

BILLFISH: Thank goodness the fishing for Striped Marlin has improved! The best area to find them has been around the 1150 spot, but anywhere from the 95 Spot to the Gorda Banks has had fish at times, it’s just that the concentrations tend to move around with the bait and temperature. One day the bite would be hot right on top of the 1150, then nest day it would be hot ten miles further to the east, and the third day the concentration could have moved to just outside the Gorda Banks area. The important part is that there were numbers around, and that they were hungry. While most charters were very happy to hook a few and get one or two for release, a few boats were able to be in the right place at the right time and experienced outstanding fishing with double digit releases. Other areas around the Cape were producing Striped Marlin as well, but not in the numbers we were seeing to the east. Please remember to catch and release your billfish if they are healthy when you bring them to the boat. Do not remove them from the water as this can cause internal damage once the support of the water is removed.

YELLOWFIN TUNA: We have had plenty of football Tuna around! Several weeks ago the bite had just started to turn on for some slightly larger sized Tuna, then the purse seiners showed up, of course it went downhill then. Thankfully there are still good numbers of the footballs, and still some larger fish surprising anglers, some to 200 pounds. Most of the tuna activity has been to the south and west with the larger fish being found to the northern edge of our charter range. Boats working the Golden Gate to the San Jaime were finding enough fish to make it worth the choppy conditions (unless you asked those who got seasick!).

DORADO: Well, the Dorado made a showing! There were a couple of nice sized fish in the 20 pound class, but most of them were much smaller, really release size fish for most people as they were in the 5-8 pound class. The Dorado were found just off the beach to 10 miles offshore with the concentrations found on the Cortez side of the Cape. There were a few patches of these small guys found several miles off the beach on the Pacific side, and up to the beach itself, but no big concentration. I really hated to see a few of the boats come in flying 5 or 6 Dorado flags and then seeing these 24 inch fish being unloaded! Not a lot of meat on them, toss the little guys back and wait for the big ones!

WAHOO: I was very surprised to find that the Wahoo catch, since my last report, has improved quite a bit! For quite a while we had steady action on these speedsters, but then they disappeared. Right after that they showed up again, and action has been fairly steady on fish from 15 to 25 pounds with a few topping 40 pounds in the mix. Getting out early was the key for multiple fish, as was using wire leader. Many boats were coming in with only one out of four or five strikes due to the razor teeth slicing through the mono leaders. A few anglers were amazed to see no lure on a few lines when the mates cleared them on a hookup! The Wahoo were scattered around in the usual near-shore environment, along points or drop-offs.

INSHORE: Thank goodness the inshore fishing has picked up! We finally started seeing some decent Roosterfish as of two weeks ago. Many of the fish were small, in the 5-10 pound class, but there were plenty of them in the 15-25 pound class as well, and I talked to a few anglers who battled fish in the 40 pound class (with no luck!). As well as the Roosterfish, we have seen decent numbers of Snapper and a few nice late season Yellowtail. Toss in the normal and expected bottom fish such as Triggerfish, Grouper and Amberjack as well as an occasional influx of Jack Crevalle and there has been steady inshore action lately/

 

NOTES:

If you are planning on booking a fishing trip soon (or later in the year), contact me to see what I can set you up with. I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!

My Music of the week: The album “Live From Amsterdam, Beth Hart and Joe Bonamassa”. Simply amazing!

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

If you want to get the report every time I update, go to my blog at www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!

Meanwhile, Tight lines!

 

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Cabo Fish Report Oct. 16 – 30, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Oct. 16 – 30, 2015

SYNOPSIS: Well, the big money Billfish tournaments are over and I am glad! I have caught up on my rest and now working hard on getting the “Susie Q” up and running for charters. In the past two weeks everything has changed a bit, and for the better for most of the species, and the weather changed, for the better as well. Check below for more details!

WEATHER: It was almost like someone threw the switch once again as the change was almost overnight. We went from nighttime lows in the mid 80’s to mid to low 70’s right around the 21st, and the daytime highs have dropped to the mid to high 80’s. If it was like this year round there would be too many people living here! The skies have remained clear with just a few clouds passing through. The wind has remained fairly consistent from the north-northwest on the Pacific side and from the north-northeast on the Cortez side, but you don’t really feel it there until you get up around the Punta Gorda area.

WATER: We had the passing of Hurricane Patricia to the south of us during this reporting period and while thankfully we had no winds from it (the strongest hurricane on record in the northern hemisphere according to NOAA) we did receive some big swells. These only lasted for a day, but were large enough that the Port Captain closed the port for a day. Other than that, the swells have pretty much remained at 3-5 feet on the Pacific side and 1-3 feet on the Cortez side of the peninsula. At the start of the report period the currents on the Cortez side were screaming from the north, then they slowed down and as of now they are picking up again but from the south. Water temperatures on the Cortez side remain higher than the Pacific with almost all the water showing 84 degrees and blue. On the Pacific side the 84 degree water extend about 10 miles offshore, then it drops down to the 82 degree range, and blue.

BAIT: Live bait has been a hit or miss proposition on some mornings but when available has been mostly Caballito at the normal $3 each. No Sardinas were found locally. Frozen local Ballyhoo (unbrined) has been available from some of the bait boats at the same $3 each, but you need to be careful as some has been thawed and refrozen, these are really too soft for anything but chum.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: I think that posting some quick numbers after breaking down the tournament results will be a good indicator of how the billfishing was, as of now the Blue and Black numbers has dropped off but the Sailfish remain the same and the Striped Marlin numbers have really picked up! For the first two tournaments (5 days fishing) there was an average of 1.04 billfish caught per boat day, these numbers included 2 Blacks, 30 Blues and 240 Striped Marlin. The third tournament was the Bisbee Black and Blue so only these fish counted, not Striped Marlin and the success rate for these bigger fish was much lower at .12 fish per boat day. There were not as many Stripers caught as most boats were running baits and lures too big for the Striped Marlin to eat, but there were many of them caught, just no records of how many. Since then the Striped Marlin bite has really picked up!

YELLOWFIN TUNA: We will keep our fingers crossed that the Tuna will stay for a while, at least through the Western Outdoors Tuna Jackpot next week. The fishing has been very good at the San Jaime Banks for all sizes of Yellowfin. Fish ranging in size from 5 pounds to 290 pounds have been caught. The larger fish have been a result of finding the fish on the depth sounder and dropping bait down to them and waiting for the bite. Smaller fish have been on hootchies on the surface. There was a short burst of commercial activity as three purse seiners worked that area for several days, but since these fish have not been associated with Dolphin or anything floating two of them moved on. The one that remained was brailing a mix of fish including Hammerhead Sharks, hopefully they will move on as well. Normally the fishing for big fish is good at the Gorda Banks but it has been slow there as the strong currents have pushed the bait off the high spots, if it slows down again perhaps the fishing there will improve.

DORADO: If I had written this report fours days ago thee would have been little change from the last report. Lucky for us the situation changed then and boats have been doing well on Dorado! It seems that around six weeks ago the fishing in San Diego went dead as the fish moved back toward us. It took six weeks to get to us and now you can see yellow Dorado flags flying everywhere you look as boats are catching two, three, four or more Dorado per trip. The nice thing is that these fish are nice sized ones, not the little shakers we were getting a few weeks back. The average size is around 12 pounds but many of them are in the 15-25 pound class and there are a few over 30 pounds as well! Most of the action for these has been on the Pacific side within 10 miles of the beach, in that warmer 84 degree water. For the best results the first fish caught has been left in the water to attract others in the school, and dropping a live bait behind that one resulted in multiple hook-ups for many boats.

WAHOO: Wahoo are being caught as I write this, and it should remain fair to good as we move off of the full moon over the next several days. Most of the fish are being found in the usual areas, high spots offshore and drop offs and points next to the beach. These toothy guys have been ranging in size from 12 pounds to 30+ pounds and a lot of lures have been lost to them! When the bite is on it pays to change to wire if you don’t want to loose the lures, but the fish don’t seem to bite as well with the wire. Pulling lures at a slightly higher speed than normal, up to 10 knots, covers more area and once you get bit you need to work it hard for more!

INSHORE: With no change, inshore continues to consist of Bonito and small Yellowfin and you really have to chum to get them to start going, the problem was it was very difficult to get sardines to do this so many boats had to resort to chunking slabs of frozen squid or skipjack caught while trolling. The earlier you got out the better the action and most of it was in about 120 feet of water. Scattered Grouper, Snapper, Amberjack and Trigger fish rounded out the action.

NOTES: Hopefully in mid November I will be running a 35′ Luhrs, named the “Susie Q”. We are in the process of updating and repair which should be done in four more weeks or less, and once the paperwork is done it will be available for charter with me as the Captain. When it happens I will post pictures of the boat and rates.

If you are planning on booking a fishing trip soon (or later in the year), contact me to see what I can set you up with. I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!

My music of the week is the album “Live in Amsterdam” with Joe Bonamassa and Beth Hart. You want some blues? It does not get much better than this!

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

If you want to get the report every week, go to my blog at www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!

421.5 tuna cabo sept 19Meanwhile, Tight lines!

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
Dec 16-23, 2012

WEATHER: It’s not cold enough to snow so I guess we will not be having a white Christmas in Cabo, but sometimes in the early morning hours it sure feels as if the white stuff could come drifting down any minute. That’s what happens to you when you live where it is warm all year long and then the temperature drops, your blood thins out and it doesn’t take much to make you feel chilly. As our early morning temperatures have dropped toward the 60 degree level this week we have gotten into the “winter” mode and long-sleeved tee-shirts, long pants and socks have come out of their summer hibernation. Our days have been warming up to the low 80’s, a nice, comfortable temperature. We had a windy start to the week but as we progressed toward the end of the week the wind shifted and only started to blow in the afternoons. This made for very comfortable days on land and choppy rides home when on the water. We had partly cloudy skies this week with no rain.
WATER: With the partly cloudy skies this week it was important to get water temperature information from boats that were fishing and after talking to a lot of Captains, and checking out the satellite shots it was clear that cool 76 degree, green water had moved toward us from the north in the Sea of Cortez. At the end of the week the water outside San Jose was off-colored, very green, but the fish were still biting! As you approached Cabo the water warmed up to 80 degrees and became blue again. There was a fairly well defined break off of Palmilla Point that ran north-south. With the winds we had most of the week conditions offshore were a little bouncy, not really enough to be dangerous, but for some beginners, or inexperienced boaters it was a bit much. For those that did not experience sea-sickness, anywhere was all right, but for those with tender tummies fishing along the shoreline from the Lighthouse on the Pacific side to San Jose on the Cortez side was best. Swells were not large at only 2-5 feet on the Pacific side and 1-3 feet on the Cortez side, and since the wind tended to not come up until late in the day, going north on the Pacific side was not a problem.
BAIT: No change in the bait availability this week from last week. There was plenty of Caballito, a few Mackerel and a very limited supply of Sardina. The bigger baits were the usual $3 each while the Sardinas, if you could find a boat with some to sell, were going for $25 a scoop.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: Striped Marlin are the billfish to be looking for this time of the year as the water has cooled off a bit too much for any of the other species to be comfortable, but there is always the chance of a late Blue or Black Marlin or a stray Sailfish or two. The Striped Marlin bite that had been going on and off at the ledge off of the pacific side lighthouse slacked off this week and it was much harder to get a fish that was hungry. Most boats that were having success on Marlin were finding them tailing on the surface and tossing live bait to them, or having the fish come up into the lure pattern and dropping back rigged Ballyhoo or live bait. A few of the fish were aggressive enough to bite on lures, but they were in the minority. The bite was spread out as well with action on Marlin occurring anywhere from a mile off the beach on the Pacific side to out on the San Jaime Banks and all the way back toward San Jose on the Cortez side. There is a bit more baitfish showing up so hopefully the bite will continue to improve, but for now I think the success rate is averaging 50% or slightly better for boats targeting Billfish.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: While a few big Tuna have been caught this week on the Gordo Banks, it has been a slow bite, and most boats from Cabo have not bothered going to the trouble of traveling 1 ½ to 2 hours to get there, leaving the area to boats working out of San Jose. For the Tuna in our immediate area there have been a few pods of Porpoise up past the El Arco area inside the Golden Gate that have produced football fish from 10 to 20 pounds for boats that are first to the area. Farther offshore to the south there have been reports of a large pod of Porpoise holding in the area 20 to 30 miles out, and the fish have been better sized with a few to 100 pounds being caught. Of course with the winds picking up late morning it has been a bit choppy and hard to find them. Add in the fact that it has been an early morning bite and lady luck really came into play for boats headed in that direction. On these larger fish working lures or bait under a kite has really paid off, but the occasional nice Tuna on a lure has happened as well. The best result I heard of this week was by our friend Capt. Mike who caught 18 Tuna in one trip for his clients.

DORADO: Cool water (lord I hate to call 80 degree water cool) continues to hold off the Dorado bite, but they are still there and there are still limits being taken on a daily basis. The fishing is not wide open nor red-hot, but it has been a steady pick on fish that have run between 12 and 35 pounds with a few larger fish mixed in. As is normal with this species, finding working Frigate birds is a big bonus and trolling live bait under them really pays off. And of course there is the old decoy method of keeping the first fish hooked in the water in an attempt to attract others in the school. Since the schools are smaller and the fish a bit larger, getting just one other fish to come in is good, but there is always the chance of loosing the first fish hooked up! Other than that, just trolling live bait a mile off the beach or lures in the same area are methods that have worked well. My guess is that approximately 80% of the boats have come in with Dorado, and about half of them have had limits.
WAHOO: As the week went on the Wahoo bite improved. I was very surprised to find that they had finally arrived and boats were getting bit on a regular basis. It was not uncommon for a boat to get bit if they were fishing close to the beach and the drop-offs, but getting one to the boat was a different matter as these toothy critters really need a wire trace to keep them from cutting through the line. Either that, or a large hard bodied lure like a Rapalla or MMaurauder. Another trick that worked well was a horse Ballyhoo rigged behind a lure skirt and trolled wayyyyy back in the pattern, sometimes as much as a half-spool back if there were no other boats in the area. A lot of guys don’t like to do that as it takes so long to bring the lure in to check, but it puts the bait deeper in the water and far from the boat. I can’t argue with success and it’s one of my favorite methods.
INSHORE: Wind and swells along with stronger currents have slowed down the inshore fishing a bit, but there are still some small Roosterfish to be had as well as a scattering of small early season Sierra and Yellowtail. The bottom fish have been hard to get due to the current but a few Snapper have been brought in as well. The Roosterfish have been found along the coastline near Cabo Real while the other species have been found up past the lighthouse on the Pacific side and in the Punta Gordo are on the Cortez side.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
NOTES: Merry Christmas everyone! I hope you have a great one and everyone stays safe for the season. We gave ourselves a gift this year and went to Los Barilles on Monday and had dinner then listened to violinist Alex DePue and guitarist Miguel De Hoyos play for two hours. Wow!!! If you want a sample check them out on u-tube! So of course my music for the week is their brand new CD, “Twisted Strings”, released this year. Have a great holiday and until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts it on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the

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https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
March 19-25, 2012

WEATHER: We had another great week on the weather front, if you like it 65 degrees in the morning and 85 degrees during the day, with plenty of sun and mostly light winds. If you don’t like that kind of weather, then there is something wrong with you! No rain of course, but we did have some wind kick up on Sunday morning.
WATER: At the end of the week surface conditions on the Sea of Cortez side were great with swells at 2-4 feet and no wind chop close to shore, and only a bit in the afternoons farther out than 10 miles. On the Pacific side the swells were 3-6 feet most of the time with some chop on the water the farther north you went. Water temperaturs on the Cortez side were ranging between 70-75 degrees with the warmer water being more to the north or farther out, the cooler water just to the east of a line running along the beach on the Pacific side and extending out over the water from northwest to southeast. On the Pacific side the water was pretty much 66-67 degrees everywhere and a bit on the green side.
BAIT: Caballito and Mackerel as well as a few Mullet could be had for $3 per bait. A few of the bait boats had “frozen” ballyhoo for between $3-4, each, but you never know how many times they had been “frozen”.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: We finally had an up-tick in the catch ratios on Striped Marlin this week. With an increase in numbers seen in the area from the 1150 to outside Punta Gorda came an increase in the number of Marlin that were hungary. This combination provided action that resulted in almost every boat that went looking for a Marlin having success. A few boats did better than others, I know of a few that were releasing up to 5 per day, but most boats were getting one or two releases per trip. The fish were there in pretty good number but were not really hot and heavy in the lures, most of them were caught dropping back live bait to fish that were just checking out the lures. A few were caught by throwing a bait ahead of them while they were tailing downswell. A number of boats started to chase what they thought were marlin feeding, but it ended up that there were a large number of Thresher Sharks in the area feeding as well.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: Once again there were not a large number of Yellowfin Tuna found this week, and it was suprising since there were so many pods of white bellied porpoise to be found. A few boats got into some very small fish, and a few others got lucky and caught one or two fish in the 25 pound class, but there were no large numbers of large sizes reported to me.
DORADO: The warm water on the Cortez side of the Cape did produce some large fish this week, but not very many of them, and there were only a few boats that found them at all. I did see one fish that might have gone 50 pounds and several others that would have been in the 30 pound range, but there were no boats that I heard of that came inwith more than two Dorado, and to be real, most of the fish were smaller ones. Live bait dropped back where a Marlin came up resulted in most of the larger fsh, and boats fishing the shallow reefs and chumming caught most of the smaller fish.
WAHOO: None that I heard of this week, but perhaps the warming water and full moon of spring that is coming up will change these stats.
INSHORE: While the inshore fishing was the best way to go for the past several months due to the large numbers of Sierra and Yellowtail, this week the action dropped off a bit. The better captains were still able to put their anglers on good numbers of fish but overall success rates were down a bit. On the positive note, there was less pressure on these fish since the cruisers were going offshore for Marlin once again. The bite was still fair, with most anglers getting at least one or two nice Yellowtail to 30 pounds, but the better boats were still managing 4 to 6 per trip. Sierra numbers were down a bit as well with only a few boats managing to limit out, but anyone trying was able to get some for dinner. Sea Lions were a problem for boats fishing to the east of the lighthouse on the Pacific side, managing to find and gang up on any fish hooked up. There were decent numbers of small Roosterfish to be found in the surf, and anglers fishing off the beach did fair on Sierra and small Roosterfish early in the week, later in the week large swells caused some issues for the beach fishermen.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe! It’s a really great one.
NOTES: It is approaching the end of Spring break and the beginning of Easter Week so things will continue to be a bit rowdy at the beaches for a while. This morning we went on Daylight Saving Time, it was a bit strange and will take a while to get used to. Our friend Brian Flynn (think Santana, Beck, Loverboy, Molly Hatchet, Guess Who) has been busy playing six days a week since he got back from assisting our friend Mike Hill with the recording of his new album “No Bad Days”. They formed a group called Cabo Cowboys with Roger Gillespie on drums, Oliver C. Brown on percussion, Hal Ratliff on keyboards, Brian Flynn on guitar, Ernie Nunez on electric bass, Brian Brazil on harmonica, Miguel Hill on vocals and Rick Dale with backing vocals. You can check it out at cabocowboysmusic.com and see if you like it!
Have a great week, catch lots of fish, and get those reservations for Cabo made!

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
March 19-25, 2012

WEATHER: With the week starting off with partly cloudy skies it was nice that things cleared up and warmed up during the week. We had daytime highs in the mid to high 80’s while the early morning lows were in the low 60’s. We started every day with little if any wind and then as the day progressed the wind slowly increased so that by 3 in the afternoon it was breezy and choppy.
WATER: On the Pacific side this week the swells were fairly steady at 3-5 feet while on the Cortez side, as usual, they averaged 2 feet less at 1-3 feet. On the Pacific side along the beach early in the week we were seeing water in the mid 60’s and as the week went on warm water from the Cortez side crept around and forced the cold water north so by the end of the week we were seeing the water in the same area at 71 degrees. Offshore on the Pacific side we had the same effect going on with the warm water pushing out and across the San Jaime Bank, but by the end of the week the stronger currents coming down from the north had severed this plume of warm water, creating a hot spot just to the west of the San Jaime, while the water inshore of there cooled to 66-67 degrees. On the Cortez side the water averaged 72 degrees with a warmer area of 73-74 degree water across the 95 and 1150 areas. We came across a 1 ½ degree temperature change 22 miles to the SSE of Cabo on Tuesday, 68.3 degrees and dirty green to the west and 70 degrees and blue to the east. Had we continued to 38 miles out and to the south, we would have encountered 74 degree and blue water, oh well. Also, in the afternoons the winds picked up and kicked in whitecaps, it was water in your teeth if you were coming home from the south or southeast later in the week.
BAIT: Caballito and Mackerel as well as a few Mullet could be had for $3 per bait. A few of the bait boats had “frozen” ballyhoo for between $3-4, each, but you never know how many times they had been “frozen”.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: I did not hear of many Swordfish being seen this week, only two that I know of, and neither of them were hooked up. As far as Striped Marlin go, things are improving slightly with fish being seen around the 95 and 1150 area, right in that warm water (and blue water) area. We caught a small one just off the lighthouse on the Pacific side while on the downhill slide Friday afternoon, it struck a dorado colored lure, then ate a drop back Mackerel. Still, spotting the fins was one thing, getting them to eat another. My guess is that only 20% of the boats had Marlin releases.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: While we did not see a lot of Yellowfin close to home, a few boats that went 40+ miles both to the south and to the west reported finding an occasional pod of Dolphin holding fish to 120 pounds. Most of the fish were smaller, in the 40 to 60 pound class, but there were a few large ones in there. Unfortunately that was too far for most of the boats to go, as well as having to really get beat up on the way home. Also not all of the dolphin had Yellowfin on them, so it was a real gamble to head out there. Closer to home there were a few boats that managed to find football sized fish in open water, and a few that found fish in small pods of dolphin just off the beach. All in all the Yellowfin were scarce. Many people I talked to thought that the Yellowfin and Dorado bite was red hot, but then I explained that many of the boats were flying the yellow Dorado flags for Yellowtail and the white Tuna flags for Sierra.
DORADO: There were a few small Dorado caught this week, but no numbers like last week. If there had been something floating like there was last week (remember the dead whale?) then I am sure that there would have been a lot more action.
WAHOO: ? There may have been a few caught this week but I did not hear of them.
INSHORE: Most of the boats, both Pangas and cruisers, have been focusing their efforts on catching Yellowtail that have been averaging 23 pounds and Sierra that have been averaging 5 pounds. From the arch and on up the Pacific coastline the bite has been good for both species. Pulling small rapallas and hootchies just outside the breakers of the Sierra was good, but using small Caballito with a stinger hook just in front of the tail produced the larger fish. Of course you really went through a lot of bait that way! For the Yellowtail, once again live bait was the best producer. Yo-yo’s and diamond jigs produced some fish as did trolling large lipped plugs, but live bait was by far the best. Dropping to just off the bottom in 90 to 130 feet of water brought in fish to 45 pounds, get one of them hooked and you really had a fight on your hands! There were few grouper and snapper this week in our area, but I heard that the fishing for them was decent up around the Punta Gorda area.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this weeks recipe!
NOTES: With a nice week on the weather front and some really great inshore fishing we ended up with a great Cabo week. We also had quite a few friends visit and made new ones as well, always a nice thing to have happen. Listening to our friends in the Brian Flynn Band play in the evenings after a day of fishing or golf really topped things off. For my music selection this week I chose to listen to Ernest Ranglin, in particular his rendition of “Stop that Train”, what I have to believe is one of the best ones I have ever heard. Other of his music is great as well. Check him out and see if you don’t get moving to the beat also!
Have a great week, catch lots of fish, and get those reservations for Cabo made!

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
December 12-18, 2011

WEATHER: We had a week of cloudy skies and it seemed that the only sunshine that lasted very long happened Thursday afternoon. The rest of the week we kept thinking that it would begin raining any moment. That said, we still had great temperatures as the early morning lows were in the high 60’s and the daytime highs in the high 80’s. We did get just a little spit of rain, dotting the windshields of the cars and showing you how dusty they were, but nothing heavy here in town. There were some breezy mornings as well, not enough to keep you off the water but enough to have an effect on the golf courses!
WATER: The swells this week were mixed with some days small ones coming in from the east and other days normal ones coming from the northwest. All in all there were no large swells, the biggest were on the Pacific side at 4-6 feet, the smaller on the Cortez at 1-3 feet. Water temperatures were the key this week as the warmest water we had was to the southwest 20+ miles, there it warmed to 77 degrees. Elsewhere it stayed fairly stable at 74 degrees with the water directly to the south of the Cape a bit cooler at 73 degrees.
BAIT: Some Caballito and a few Mackerel were to be had at $3 per bait, mostly boats were getting junk bait for their money so many were going with frozen Ballyhoo instead. There were some Sardinas at $25-$30 a scoop as well.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: Still waiting! The word from private boats working the area to the north of Mag Bay is that the fish are there, one boat reported releasing 50 Striped Marlin in one day, but the concentrations have not yet moved this far south. The boats that are going out are releasing between one and four per day and the methods have varied. Some boats have done well by dropping a live bait to 250 feet off the points and have been getting one or two per day, others are running a rigged ballyhoo on the long line and are getting bit on that. Some boats are having better luck pulling plastic lures and dropping back rigged bait to fish that come into the pattern and that won’t bite on the lures. Anyway that is being used seems to work for a few fish, the trick is to find them! Almost all the action we have seen has come from the Pacific side but there have been a few showing up on the 95 spot and the 1150.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: We are still experiencing very good fishing for Yellowfin Tuna, and there are still some large fish out there. Of course most of the boats are getting fish between 12 and 25 pounds with a few in the 60 pound range but there have been several fish this week that have been over 200 pounds. Most of these larger fish have been caught by boats flying a kite. The majority of the schools have been found between 14 and 24 miles to the south and west among spotted and spinner dolphin, the white bellied dolphin have not seemed to have as many fish with them. If you are thinking about getting some tuna it’s time to get here, we expect the purse seiners to start back in operation the first of the year, but right now it’s possible to limit out on every trip. That’s no guarantee of course as the tide can have a strong effect on your success. At the end of the week the bite was good early in the morning and then as the tide changed the bite turned off.
DORADO: There are still plenty of Dorado out there even thought the water has cooled down, the trick is getting them to eat! Boats that have concentrated on pulling lures have not been having a lot of luck. The best way has been to slow troll a live bait or two, hooking one up and leaving him in the water to attract other Dorado. It’s possible to limit out at two fish per angler this way, and the fish are fairly decent size at 15-25 pounds. Most of the effort has been on the Pacific side but I did hear of some decent fishing happening off of the Palmilla area.
WAHOO: The Wahoo bite died off this week as the moon started waning, but there were still a few caught, just no large ones. Those that were hooked up came from the usual areas, just off the beach along the rocky areas and off of the shallow sea-mounts like the Gorda Banks.
INSHORE: Sierra are starting to bite good and there are some Snapper in there among the rocks if you have the hooks and lead to spare. Most of the Pangas are fishing live bait for Dorado and venturing offshore for Tuna and Marlin as the fishing for these have been pretty good and the water comfortable.
FISH RECIPE: posted on the blog Thursday or Friday.
NOTES: Whales, cloudy skies and fish, not our normal Cabo weather, but everything else is the same! This weeks report was written to the music of Steppenwolf from a facebook friend who keeps posting clips! Thanks to everyone for reading, and tight lines!

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
December 5-11, 2011

WEATHER: The closer we get to Christmas the cooler we seem to get. Our low for the week was 61 degrees in the early morning, enough to make us wear light jackets to the Marina in the morning! I know, I know, but when you have lived in the warm stuff as long as we have you get acclimated and when it drops into the low 60’s it’s COLD! Later in the week clouds moved in and it warmed up 10 degrees as the heat was trapped. Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80’s, just about perfect as far as I am concerned. Early in the week we had mostly sunny skies. Early Saturday morning it was cloudy, a solid layer over us so we missed the lunar eclipse.
WATER: Surface conditions this week on both sides of the Cape were very good with only slight swells on the Cortez side and swells at 3-5 feet on the Pacific side. The Pacific side did experience a bit of chop in the afternoons as the wind seemed to start picking up around 10AM. Just as our air temperatures seem to drop as we get toward Christmas, so do the water temperatures. The water just off the tip of the Cape seems to be 77-78 degrees and extend all across our fishing area from Los Frailles up to Todo Santos out a distance of 20 miles. Outside of that area it drops a bit to about 75 degrees. That is the way it was at the end of the week at least. We started the week with a band of cooler water (75 degrees) running along the beach on the Pacific side, it extended out about 2 miles. This cool water had disappeared by the end of the week.
BAIT: It was a hit or miss approach this week when it came to getting bait. There were not many days when you could get a good quality live bait, there was a lot of junk showing up from the bait boats. If you were early, lucky and had a captain and deckhand with good eyes it was possible to get some decent Caballito at the usual $3 per bait. There were some mullet and a few, very few, Mackerel available, also at $3 per bait. Sardinas were also there at $25-$30 a scoop depending on the supplier. A few of the bait boats had thawed horse Ballyhoo at $3-$4 per bait as well.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: We keep waiting for the hoards of Striped Marlin to come down to us but there has not been a strong showing in our area as of this date. A few boats that have gone a bit farther up the line have encountered decent concentrations and have done well, but the distances involved right now put these fish out of reach of the daily charter trips. Hopefully as the water continues to cool the fish will come our way. For the moment we have to be content with an average of one to two Striped Marlin per trip for the boats that concentrate on them. The best results this week have come on trolled Ballyhoo and good live bait tossed in front of tailing fish. Almost all the action has happened on the Pacific side, but it has been a bit spread out. A few boats on half day trips have been lucky and found fish just off the lighthouse, but others have blanked in the same area. Some boats have found three or four fish to release up to the north past the Golden Gate Banks and others in the same area have nor seen a fish, so you can see that there is a lot of luck involved right now. We hope the concentrations arrive soon, it sure would be nice to be seeing double digit releases every day!
YELLOWFIN TUNA: There are still large fish out there as several boats have proven this week, it’s just that you have to find which tree they are hiding behind. Get it? There is not any kind of pattern to these larger Yellowfin with the exception of the Gorda Banks, and there it has been a matter of putting in the time with the right bait and terminal gear. Offshore it has been a matter of finding the right pod of porpoise to work. There are plenty of pods out there but not all of them hold Tuna, and not all of those have large fish, and those that do have large fish often have fish that will just wave their fins at you and smirk. You like being frustrated? Try fishing just for large Tuna and you will be happy. There have been plenty of the small variety out thee but once again it has been a matter of being in the right place at the right time. Some boats are coming in with one or two footballs, others with five or six and once in a while a boat will have several larger #30-#40 fish aboard. The large fish, those over #100 pounds, have been there as well, but as I said they have been spread out. These larger fish have been coming in from boats using kites for the most part,but a few of them have been caught on trolled lures.
DORADO: Still the mainstay of the fleet boats, they are beginning to make themselves a bit more scarce. While several weeks ago it was common to come in with a near-limit load of fish, this week most of the boats have been lucky to get two or three fish and some have actually caught none at all. I think it is a matter of the water cooling off, but then I have to blame it on something! The boats that have done the best have been leaving the first fish hooked up in the water and dropped bait behind the boat, using the first fish as a teaser to bring in more Dorado. This method has worked well, but you always run the risk of loosing that first fish as a few anglers have found out! The best fishing for Dorado has still been on the Pacific side close to the beach.
WAHOO: There was actually a pretty decent Wahoo bite this week as we had the full moon at the end of the week. A lot of these were very small fish, I saw one come off a boat that I first mistook for a Sierra, was it not for the strong bars on the side I would have not known it was a Wahoo, perhaps it would have pushed the scale to 4 pounds, Sad, but there you go. Most of the fish that were caught were larger than that, averaging 25 pounds but even though there were more this week, they still were not common. The best areas were on top of the Gorda Banks and along the rocky points on the Pacific coast. A fair number were found offshore under the shark floats.
INSHORE: Inshore fishing at the beginning of the week was pretty good with a great showing of Sierra up off the beach at Migrineo, some good Snapper fishing among the rocks on the Pacific side as well as a few scattered small Roosterfish and a lot of Pompano. This was when we had that band of cool water running along the beach on the Pacific side. Mid-week things turned around for several days as the water switched, warmed a bit and became gin-clear along the shoreline and very few fish were caught. At the end of the week it has settled down again and while there were still no Sierra, the Snapper and Pompano had begin to bite again. The largest number of fish caught though seemed to be the Mexican Marlin (also know as needle-fish).
FISH RECIPE: posted on the blog Thursday or Friday. We have been really busy the past several weeks and promise to get a new one up this week! Really!
NOTES: Once again we experienced near perfect weather and very good fishing. The whales have started to put on the shows we love and the water has been in great shape. Christmas is coming up and maybe if you have been god this year, Santa will give you a trip to Cabo for a present! This weeks report was written to a mix of Texas rock-a-billy music, courtesy of my friend Mark Bailey. Oh, that’s right, delivered to me by Mark and recorded by his son Alan! Thanks guys! Until next week, tight lines!