Cabo Fish Report June 3 – 9, 2016

IMG00076-20121009-1357.jpgFLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

June 3 – 9, 2016

SYNOPSIS: It has been two months since my last report as we had seen very little change in conditions until recently. Several weeks ago things began to improve as the water began to change a little and now we have experienced decent fishing for the past two weeks, with fingers crossed it will be even better! Striped Marlin to the southeast and easterly, Tuna out front and to the west, Dorado and Wahoo scattered closer to the beach and some good Roosterfishing along the coast line. Check below for a few more details!

WEATHER: This morning it was 67 degrees at 6 am, three days ago it was 79 degrees and everyone was shopping for new floor fans! We have clear mostly cloud-free skies at the moment but just experienced three days of cloud cover. No rain and the breezes have been picking up a bit in the evening. During our week of warm weather the winds appeared from the south, coming off the warmer water down there, more recently the cooler winds have started in again from the northwest, again from the cool water to the north.

WATER: As of today we were seeing cool, almost cold water along the beach, the temperatures were ranging from 68 to 70 degrees with the cooler water on the Pacific side. Last week these waters were in the 70 – 77 degree range. Once you get offshore around 10 or more miles the water warms up to 74 degrees, last week we were seeing the temperature around 77 degrees. The water overall is an off-blue color with currents now coming up from the south. Wind chop on top of three to five foot swells on the Pacific side made fishing to the west and south uncomfortable for some people, but for those who did not mind getting a bit wet, the fishing was worth it. The water conditions on the Sea of Cortez side were much better than on the Pacific, but well offshore there were still some large swells wrapping around the Cape.

BAIT: The bait availability has been on and off, with a variety of live baits but no one species except Caballito in abundance. There have been a few Mackerel, Look-downs, grunts, green jacks and little pompano, no Sardinas that I heard of. The live baits have been the normal $3 each, and many of the boats have been using (or at least taking) frozen ballyhoo in order to be sure of having something fishy to use!

FISHING:

BILLFISH: Thank goodness the fishing for Striped Marlin has improved! The best area to find them has been around the 1150 spot, but anywhere from the 95 Spot to the Gorda Banks has had fish at times, it’s just that the concentrations tend to move around with the bait and temperature. One day the bite would be hot right on top of the 1150, then nest day it would be hot ten miles further to the east, and the third day the concentration could have moved to just outside the Gorda Banks area. The important part is that there were numbers around, and that they were hungry. While most charters were very happy to hook a few and get one or two for release, a few boats were able to be in the right place at the right time and experienced outstanding fishing with double digit releases. Other areas around the Cape were producing Striped Marlin as well, but not in the numbers we were seeing to the east. Please remember to catch and release your billfish if they are healthy when you bring them to the boat. Do not remove them from the water as this can cause internal damage once the support of the water is removed.

YELLOWFIN TUNA: We have had plenty of football Tuna around! Several weeks ago the bite had just started to turn on for some slightly larger sized Tuna, then the purse seiners showed up, of course it went downhill then. Thankfully there are still good numbers of the footballs, and still some larger fish surprising anglers, some to 200 pounds. Most of the tuna activity has been to the south and west with the larger fish being found to the northern edge of our charter range. Boats working the Golden Gate to the San Jaime were finding enough fish to make it worth the choppy conditions (unless you asked those who got seasick!).

DORADO: Well, the Dorado made a showing! There were a couple of nice sized fish in the 20 pound class, but most of them were much smaller, really release size fish for most people as they were in the 5-8 pound class. The Dorado were found just off the beach to 10 miles offshore with the concentrations found on the Cortez side of the Cape. There were a few patches of these small guys found several miles off the beach on the Pacific side, and up to the beach itself, but no big concentration. I really hated to see a few of the boats come in flying 5 or 6 Dorado flags and then seeing these 24 inch fish being unloaded! Not a lot of meat on them, toss the little guys back and wait for the big ones!

WAHOO: I was very surprised to find that the Wahoo catch, since my last report, has improved quite a bit! For quite a while we had steady action on these speedsters, but then they disappeared. Right after that they showed up again, and action has been fairly steady on fish from 15 to 25 pounds with a few topping 40 pounds in the mix. Getting out early was the key for multiple fish, as was using wire leader. Many boats were coming in with only one out of four or five strikes due to the razor teeth slicing through the mono leaders. A few anglers were amazed to see no lure on a few lines when the mates cleared them on a hookup! The Wahoo were scattered around in the usual near-shore environment, along points or drop-offs.

INSHORE: Thank goodness the inshore fishing has picked up! We finally started seeing some decent Roosterfish as of two weeks ago. Many of the fish were small, in the 5-10 pound class, but there were plenty of them in the 15-25 pound class as well, and I talked to a few anglers who battled fish in the 40 pound class (with no luck!). As well as the Roosterfish, we have seen decent numbers of Snapper and a few nice late season Yellowtail. Toss in the normal and expected bottom fish such as Triggerfish, Grouper and Amberjack as well as an occasional influx of Jack Crevalle and there has been steady inshore action lately/

 

NOTES:

If you are planning on booking a fishing trip soon (or later in the year), contact me to see what I can set you up with. I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!

My Music of the week: The album “Live From Amsterdam, Beth Hart and Joe Bonamassa”. Simply amazing!

The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.

If you want to get the report every time I update, go to my blog at www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!

Meanwhile, Tight lines!

 

Cabo Fish Report May 5 – 18, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com http://www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
May 5 – 18, 2015

SYNOPSIS: Just a quick change-up on the Cabo Fish Report to assist those of you who only want an overview for the reporting period. Below is slightly more detailed information! This Cabo Fish Report will cover the past two weeks instead of the normal week period since there was little change from the April to May report! Billfish are everywhere! Every trip there are 20 to 30 Striped Marlin being spotted, but they are full and not willing to eat. That has been about the only offshore action here in Cabo. Cabrillo, Triggerfish and a few Amberjack inshore, with a few Wahoo as well. Only a couple of Dorado reported and still no sign of Yellowfin in our area. Now, for more detailed information in this Cabo Fish Report, please keep on reading!
WEATHER: It was an interesting weather period for us this past two weeks. The first week covered by this report we had the normal lows of 70 degrees and daytime highs of high 80’s with sunny skies. As the second week came onto the calendar The skies began to cloud up and the temperatures increased. Our morning lows rose steadily from 70 to 78 over four days, the humidity increased right along with the temps and finally, on Wednesday the rain fell. It started with just a few sprinkles, the window spotting kind and we thought that was all we were going to get. The twice the skies opened up, the lightning and thunder happened and we received real rain, the kind that washes everything off, no dust anywhere, and the roads running with water! The winds started to blow afterward and on Thursday morning we were back to 69 degrees in the morning with daytime high of 82 degrees and just a few clouds aloft. Since then the temps have increased a couple of degrees, and the wind has blown in the afternoon and the skies have remained almost cloud free!
WATER: There has been almost no change in water temperatures over the past two weeks as the Pacific side from El Arco and up remained in the 70-71 degree range. From there to around the 95 spot, inshore and offshore the water was a little warmer at 74-75 degrees and from San Jose and north on the Cortez side we were marking 77-78 degrees. Currents on the Pacific side were almost due south from the north and across the Cape and up to Punta Gorda they were running a slight bit weaker from the east to west. If what we have been seeing watching the currents continues as it has been, we could receive warmer water to 80+ degrees in the next several weeks, The water on the Pacific side was cooler than elsewhere, and a bit greener as well. Early last week the currents pushed strongly from the north for a day and brought very green water from the shore to 15 miles out at the end of the Cape. The warmer water on the Cortez side has remained much clearer and cleaner. We had a second round of large swells developed from the same storm system way to the south come and visit us on the 14th. Not as large as the surprise ones from the week before, but with no wind on top it was easy to deal with.
BAIT: Very little change on the bait availability with live Caballito at $3 each and frozen Ballyhoo costing the same.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: The number of Striped Marlin being seen seems to increase every day! The only issue is that they don’t want to eat. The majority of the fish that are being caught and brought to the boat have been tossing up squid in sizes from three to seven inches so the hungry fish may be feeding deep and the ones being seen on the surface are full and just traveling. Quite a few boats have been trying down-riggers around the high spots such as the 95 spot and the Gordo Banks, but instead of catching Marlin, most of the bites have been from sharks, ranging from 30 pound Makos to 200 pound Bull sharks with a few Blue sharks and one Thresher and a Hammerhead in the mix. The majority of Striped Marlin that have been caught have been on disabled live bait, the upper lobe of the tail clipped so they are pushing upward and a small slice on the lateral line to slow them and keep the scent in the water. With the Marlin feeding on squid they don’t want to expend the energy to chase down a healthy live bait. Almost all of the fish have been found either due south of the Cape out toward the 95 and 1150 spots, but the better hook-up ratios seem to be closer to the beach rather than out deep. Working the western edges of the high spots has been better than roaming around the open areas.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: We keep hoping for a showing of Tuna in our area, and if the currents continue to run the way they are we may finally get to see some. There are fish being caught around the Punta Gorda area, and occasionally a great bite has happened, but it has not been steady there either.

DORADO: Once again we had very few Dorado caught this week, and most of the ones brought in were small, in the five to 12 pound class. The warmer water on the Cortez side, and well offshore were where they were found, but there were no concentrations, all the fish (I use the term loosely) were scattered throughout the area.
WAHOO: Wahoo always surprise me as while the best bite is normally on the full moon, they can, and do, show up at any time. There were reports that late last week there was a good Wahoo bite on the Cortez side, and I did see at least on that looked to be 50+ pounds as well as several smaller 20 pound fish brought to the docks. Reports were of many leaders getting bit through by the Wahoo’s sharp teeth, and most of these attacks took place among boats drifting live bait deep around the shelf drops on the Cortez side. A few were taken on swimming plugs and surface lures as well, and in the same areas.
INSHORE: Inshore action for the past two weeks has been inconsistent with the first week of the month providing some decent shots at Roosterfish to 25 pounds, and then they seemed to go away. The bite on Bonita and Skipjack has remained fantastic and Cabrillo as well as Triggerfish have offered inshore anglers a nice variety to focus their efforts on. Very few Sierra or Yellowtail have been reported, it may be the end of what little season we had for them this year. As the water continues to warm the inshore availability continues to change.
NOTES: I am going to start posting the report on Mondays instead of on Sundays from now on as we seem to be having more trips on the weekends and I like having the best information possible to share with you. The more anglers who get out, the better my information is. The fishing pressure is still light, so if you want to get on the water there is plenty of room! I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!
My music of the week is Pink Floyd “A Momentary Lapse of Reason”, we just had a Pink Floyd tribute concert this week, so there you go!
The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.
Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out http://www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.
If you want to get the report every week, go to my blog at http://www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!
Meanwhile, Tight lines!

Cabo Fish Report April 27 – May 4, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com http://www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
April 27 – May 4, 2015

WEATHER: No rain again! I don’t know why I am happy about that, we always need rain, but instead we had these terrible sunny days with early morning lows in the high 60’s to low 70’s and daytime highs ranging from the high 70’s to high 80’s. Boring stuff when it is every day, all day. Just joking! It has been wonderful this week, the only issue we had was the wind which started showing up good on Thursday afternoon and blew strongly every day since then, coming from the northwest at first then from the south mid day Friday and all day Saturday. On Sunday it started coming out of the west-northwest again.
WATER: It was interesting on the water this week to say the least. We began the week with medium swells that grew in size as the weekend approached. The early part of the week we saw swells at 2-4 feet with surf at the normal 5-6 feet on the Pacific side. Near the end of the week on Thursday they started to pick up and on Saturday we had swells at 6 to 9 feet from the southwest with surf running 12 to 15 feet. This was a result of a strong storm off of South America, it is expected to have tapered off the the 3-6 foot range by Wednesday. The combination of large swells and strong winds resulted in the Port Captain closing the port on Saturday afternoon, and on Sunday it was closed to small boats such as Pangas, but the larger cruisers were allowed out. This morning it was open to all vessels, but I saw a few cruisers returning quickly with seasick passengers.
Water temperatures on the Pacific side were 71-72 degrees while the temperatures directly off the Cape were in the 67-68 degree range. As you continued on up the coast toward the East Cape the water slowly warmed until it reached a 77-78 degree area off of the Vinorama area. Clarity in all areas was a bit off, but particularly from the beach to two miles out on the Cortez side of the Cape, where the strong swells stirred a great amount of detritus and sand when pounding the beaches. The currents were also ripping this week with very strong currents from the northwest along the southern portions of the Pacific side and very strong currents from the southwest from San Jose and north on the Cortez side.
BAIT: Due to the swells there were no Sardinas available from mid-week on, and the amount of Caballito was down as well. What bait was available was the normal $3 each, and there were plenty of frozen local ballyhoo at $3 each.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: The number of Striped Marlin being seen improves day by day, but the number being hooked up still remains low. Low is a relative term, and by that I mean compared to the numbers seen, the hookup ratio is low. Having said that, the bite has improved quite a bit since the last report, with most of the boats fishing for them getting hooked up and quite a few of those boats (actually the large majority) getting at least one, often more than that, to the boat for a release. These large swells may bring even more fish to the surface as they ride the face of these and perhaps the bite will get even better! I can’t wait until we start seeing every boat with multiple releases! Meanwhile, the best bite was found from straight off the arch to the 1150 Spot, much of it happening along the temperature change on the east side of the cool water plume. Live bait thrown in front of tailing fish was the number one hook up method, and live bait dropped back to fish attracted to lures in the trolling pattern was number two.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: There was no change in the Tuna situation this week. Maybe the Yellowfin will show up in our area soon, but this week was once again extremely slow here in Cabo. The fish that had been showing up off of the Punta Gorda high spots were reported as having an off time early in the week, but just as the winds and swell picked up there were a few reports of decent action a bit farther offshore, between Punta Gorda and the 1150, out around 20 miles. That action was short lived however as the surface conditions became a steady “victory at sea” event. Putting it another way, there were so many sheep in the field you could not count them all!

DORADO: There were still some Dorado being found, and I guess it is not a big surprise after all as the water on the Cortez side is warm enough for them to stay. Not a lot were caught, but a few of them were decently sized in the 20 pound class. There were quite a few smaller 8-10 pound class fish compared to the larger ones, and the luckier boats managed to get two or three. Most boats did not luck out though, and did not get a strike. I was told that the boats that did get a few of these great eating fish found them under working Frigates, always worth checking out!
WAHOO: I was fairly surprised when we did not see many Wahoo early in the week, normally we get a half decent bite just before the full moon. Of course the best bite always occurs three days before the full moon, and since tonight is the full moon that should have been the past three days. However….the swells have really stirred things up close to shore and that is where the majority of Wahoo are found, along the rocky points and drop offs. Usually a few larger fish are found in the open water, but I did hear of any in the later part of the week.
INSHORE: The week started out getting a bit better for inshore fishing as a number of decent Yellowtail in the 15-25 pound class were found in deeper water (150-300 feet), and they were biting on live bait just off the bottom. There were a few Grouper as well and an occasional school of Amberjack would move in for a quick visit. Small schools of Sierra were being found along the beach on the Pacific side and anglers working for them in 75-25 feet of water were getting from 6 to 15 fish per trip. On the Cortez side there were schools of small Roosterfish running from 3 to 10 pounds and they were attacking live baits, but most of the live bait was too large for them to munch on! Well, the bite was decent early on, but then the winds and then the swells came to visit and suddenly the bite went to nothing, then the boats were not allowed out. Sometimes that happens!
NOTES: I am going to start posting the report on Mondays instead of on Sundays from now on as we seem to be having more trips on the weekends and I like having the best information possible to share with you. The more anglers who get out, the better my information is. The fishing pressure is still light, so if you want to get on the water there is plenty of room! I offer fishing charters for people with any type of experience on the water at reasonable rates, and service is the name of the game to me!
My music of the week is Craig Chaquico on “Fire Red Moon”, this album is on fire with the blues!
The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like to book a charter, check out http://www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site , it is still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month.
If you want to get the report every week, go to my blog at http://www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up! No spam, I do not share your e-mail and you can un-subscribe at any time!
Meanwhile, Tight lines!
rmarlin head reid

Cabo Fish Report for April 7 – 12, 2015

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com http://www.flyhooker.com https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
April 7 – 12, 2015

WEATHER: It feels as if we are coming into a summer weather pattern, at least for this week. Last week our lows were in the low 70’s but this week they have increased a bit every day. Friday the low was 75 degrees at 6 AM, Saturday it was at 76 degrees and this morning it was 77 degrees. The daytime highs have ranged between 90 and 94 degrees All of this is warmer than it has been the last several years, and along with the heat has come increased humidity. I have no idea if this is an indicator of things to come, but I am surprised. We had partly cloudy skies this week and the weather services were calling for a decent chance of rain on Friday, this was changed to Saturday and then to Sunday. Being at the tip of the peninsula we have no idea if it will ever happen as conditions can change so rapidly.
WATER: The water on the Pacific side of the Cape continues to be warmer than normal with most areas showing 73-74 degrees along the beach and just a half degree cooler offshore. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water is showing at 76-77 degrees with an occasional spot of 78 degrees. Both sides of the Cape have decently clean water but the currents on the Pacific side are roaring along strongly from the northwest while on the Cortez side they are weak and from the north east, basicly both are following the contours of the land. The weak currents on the Cortez side appear to be the remnants of the Pacific currents as they loop around the Cape and form a weak circular pattern between us and the East Cape.
BAIT: Just as it was last week, most of the bait available from the bait boats was Caballito with a mix of green jacks and misc. small fish. The boats also had some frozen Ballyhoo and both frozen and live bait was offered at $3 each piece. Calming seas have allowed the net boats in the San Jose area to find and catch sardinas, and if you are in the area early enough you had a chance to buy a scoop for $25.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: There was little change this week on the billfish front with many more fish being seen tailing down swell than we had several weeks ago, but they still seem to be without an appetite. A few boats were able to find fish that would bite and managed to release one or two, but most of the boats had an exercise in frustration as they tossed bait at one fish after another only to see the bait totally ignored. It may be because the fish are full and have been feeding deep, or perhaps the bait is not the right kind, or the moon phase is not perfect, who knows for sure. All we really know is that if you managed to get hooked up to a Striped Marlin, you were one of the lucky ones! There were also reports of a few small Black and Blue Marlin being seen and occasionally getting hooked up, most likely due to the warmer than normal water we seeing has plenty of the type of bait they love, Skipjack and Bonita. My guess (based on talking to captains and anglers) would be that 45% of the boats fishing offshore had a Marlin strike, while perhaps 25% overall had a successful release. While these percentages are fantastic compared to many places, they are much less than we are used to here. Still, you are not going to catch a Marlin while sitting at the beach bar!
YELLOWFIN TUNA: We still have a drought on Yellowfin in Cabo. A few boats were able to get a football size fish or two while fishing close to the beach, but they were vastly outnumbered by the Skipjack and Bonita. Boats that went searching offshore were able to find a few pods of Porpoise, but none of them (that I heard of) held any Tuna. I was told by several anglers that fished out of San Jose that the high spots off of Punta Gorda were serving up some Yellowfin in the 10 – 25 pound class with one larger fish reported at 60 pounds, but they told me the bite was either very early in the morning or almost dark in the evening. Apparently Seals and Sea Lions were an issue as well with many fish being lost to these mammals.

DORADO: Fishing for Dorado this week was an exercise in frustration for most crews as they were few and far between. Normal methods such as getting one while trolling and then dropping a bait back only resulted in a second fish about 20% of the time (normally about 60%) but the biggest issue was getting that first fish hooked up. The Dorado were scattered up and down the coast on the Pacific side with no concentrations anywhere. Spotting feeding Frigates was almost the only way to find the fish (of any offshore species) other than blind trolling. Since there were few fish to begin with, spotting these frigates became vital for a good catch.
WAHOO: I neither saw nor heard of any Wahoo being caught out of Cabo, but I am sure there were a few. I am just a bit surprised since we had a full moon on the 7th, but the waning moon is never as good for these fish as the waxing moon.
INSHORE: Inshore fishing remains limited to mostly Sierra, and if you find a school of them along the beach you can do really well, often limiting out. They have been averaging 6 pounds with a few larger ones in the mix. Chumming them up and then dropping strip baits back to the have offered the best chances at limits, but trolling hootchies and small swimming plugs also worked decently. Some of the boats fishing with fly fishermen did very well with the chumming method but lost many flies due to the sharp teeth on the Sierra. Besides Sierra, boats were finding small red snapper, some decent Amberjack, plenty of Skipjack and Bonita. The Yellowtail have still been a rare visitor to the party but the few that have been caught were caught on live bait drifted just off the bottom in 200+ feet of water.
NOTES: The number of whales being seen has dropped off from last weeks numbers, they are heading back north, as are the spring breakers. The beaches are much calmer now! I do have a very sad not to offer in this report. Those of you who have visited Cabo for any length of time may know Juanito, the owner of the Cabo Lounge. He was just recently diagnosed with stomach cancer and passed away Saturday morning. We will miss this wonderful man, a friend to everyone he met and with a smile and happy words for all. RIP Junaito, we miss you.
The information I use in these reports are obtained in many different ways, some from personal experience, some from my clients and Captains who are out every day, and some from on-line subscription services such as Fish-Track, BuoyWeather and SurfZone as well as HurricaneZone. I, and only I, am responsible for any errors made, as I sift all this information and compile it.

Music of the week is “Ain’t in it for the Money” by Micky and the Motorcars, a great western rock album. Check them out at http://www.mickyandthemotorcars.com. Thanks Mark Bailey for turning me on to them so many years ago!
Thank you very much for checking out my report, and if you would like, check out http://www.flyhooker.com, I have just re-vamped the web site and you may like it. Still under development, but there will be new photos, articles, tips and techniques every week starting next month. I am going to set up a link on the website so you can access the archived reports at my blog. I have tried to load them on the website, but 10 years of weekly reports have slowed down my ability to make changes to anything else. The link will take you to the blog and all the reports since 2010 are listed there. If you want a report from years prior to that let me know and I will e-mail them to you, they go back through 2005.
If you want to get the report every week, go to my blog at http://www.captgeo.wordpress.com and sign up!
Meanwhile, Tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Latest Cabo Fishing Update!

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com

www.flyhooker.com

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Dec. 2 – 8, 2013

WEATHER: Partly sunny skies once again, and while most of our friend and clients in the U.S. were shivering we were enjoying temperatures in the high 70’s and low 80’s during the daytime. We did our shivering at night after the sun had set and the breeze cooled us off. It seems my blood has thinned a bit as 72 degrees makes me get goose bumps and put on long sleeved shirts or a light jacket or sweater. Please don’t make fun of those of us who walk around with a sweater on while you gambol about in your swimsuits! I know we look funny while walking the beach but at least there is no snow or ice on the ground!

WATER: The Pacific side has had little change in water temperature this week, the water to the inside of the San Jaime and Golden Gate Banks is still warmer than elsewhere on the Pacific at a fairly consistent 78-79 degrees, down a degree or two from last week, but that’s what happens in the winter here. Outside of the banks, to the west, the temperature has been in the 72-73 range, with this cooler water once again being a bit cleaner than the warmer inside water. Afternoon winds have had a fairly strong effect on the surface conditions as well with the swells in the mornings at 2-5 feet, but after the winds start (around noon every day) the wind chop picks up and we get a bit of cross swell of 1-2 feet from the wind that makes for interesting rides home. On the Cortez side of the Cape the water has been a consistent 78-79 degrees with a few spots peaking at 80 degrees. Surface conditions have been much better with swells staying in the 3 foot range and the wind chop not having much, if any effect once you get to the west and north of the 95 spot. The water on this side of the Cape has been a bit off-color, tending toward a clean green instead of a deep blue.

BAIT: While Caballito remains the most common of the larger baits (which are selling for the normal $3 each) there are a few more Mackerel showing up in the bottoms of the bait boats. Still not very common yet, there should be more soon as the water continues to cool. Other than those two species, your choice is Green Jacks and small Pompano. I have not heard of any Sardines available locally, but there might have been some available up in San Jose.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: There was not much change this week from last weeks Billfish report. They still seem to be hanging out along the temperature break on the Pacific side, but there are small concentrations as well along the coast at the normal high spots such as right off the Lighthouse on the peanut shaped ledge and on the ridge running straight out from Los Arcos farther up the coast. There is a small bump to the inside/north of the Golden Gate that has also been producing a few fish, not to mention the small concentrations atop the Golden Gate Bank. I have heard from a few boats that made the run that there are some decent concentrations found this wee at the Finger Bank as well, but it has just been rumors, third hand information, so I have not been able to confirm it. The key to getting a Marlin (and they have all been Striped Marlin) has been to keep an eye on the sky and an eye on the depth finder. When you see the Frigate birds start to swoop, head there, as the fish are beginning to force a bait ball to the surface. If you see a bait ball on the depth sounder, stay there until the Marlin force it to the surface. Basicly, follow the bait, the fish will be where the food is. Sight fishing by spotting tail and fin tips and tossing a bit also worked well, and often produced double hook-ups. Seeing a “picket fence” with several fish in a row is beginning to become more common and offers a good chance at multiple hook-ups. The preferred bait has been Mackerel, but the fish will eat Caballito as well if they are hungry, the smaller baits seem to get eaten more often than the larger ones. Fish found just off the beach are suckers for the small Pompano, it seems to be a matter of “matching-the-hatch”, so to speak.

YELLOWFIN TUNA: I am still being patient, I have no choice. There are a few football to 25 pound fish around, but the chances of getting into them are small as the pods of porpoise they have been found with are scattered all over the place. I know of Pangas working the Dorado inside that have spotted small groups of porpoise and have hooked and landed several Yellowfin to 25 pounds, and cruiser going 30 miles off the beach doing the same thing. Some boats have reported finding pods of porpoise that cover acres of water but have not had any fish under them, while they find just a few porpoise that have given up four to six small Yellowfin. No rhyme or reason to it, just chance as far as I can tell.

 

 

DORADO: Lots of small 6 to 8 pound fish have been striking lures and trying to eat live bait on the Pacific side of the Cape. The warmer, cleaner water has kept them around, trying the warm water on the Cortez side has not resulted in as many fish and the water is more green there as well. Getting a bigger Dorado this past week has been a matter of working harder and smarter. The plume of warm water running up the coast seems to taper to a point around Todo Santos, and boats going that far up have seen slightly larger fish. It may be a matter of the narrowing warm water concentrating the fish, but the fish caught toward the north have been consistently in the 12-15 pound class. Closer to home, in order to get the larger fish, you have had to make a slight change in tactics. Boats that were fishing using wire line or torpedo sinkers to get jet-head lures and swimming plugs down deep for Wahoo were hooking a few larger Dorado, some to 30 pounds, while boats pounding the surface were only getting the little guys. Having noticed this, quite a few boats began running down-riggers and Z-Wings with live bait to attract the larger Dorado. The only problem with this is that if there were Wahoo around, they would get the bait bitten in half or the leader cut without ever noticing it happen. Also, it is a great method for catching Striped Marlin as well and often one of these would gulp the bait. For anglers only wanting to fish for meat fish, this was not what they wanted. Well, I have always been happy to catch something rather than nothing, and would never turn my nose up at catching a Marlin!

WAHOO: These fish are still here, and still biting, but you have to be in the right place, at the right time, using the right gear in order to have a decent shot at them. We just came off the new moon on the third, and have the full moon coming up around the 17th, so the bite should, repeat, should, be good then for these speedsters. The right place means along steep drop-offs, high spots on the bottom, ridges projecting out from shore and canyons running right up to the beach. The right time has been just before and just after tide change, when the water starts moving again. The right gear means lures with a short trace of wire leader to prevent cut-offs, lures or swimming plugs that will go deep, the deeper the better, and run at speed. If using live bait, make sure there is a trailing hook wired to the front hook as to prevent having the bait cut in half without hooking up, and running the bait deep.

INSHORE: There were some decent sized Roosterfish reported this week, by decent I mean in the 18-25 pound class, but they were still out numbered by the little 5-6 pound fish. There were many more Sierra showing up as well with some of the fish coming in reaching the 8 pound mark on the scales, but most of them were 4-5 pounds. The Snapper bite dropped off, perhaps due to the new moon, but should improve once the full moon comes around. Once again, if you get into the stacks of Snapper that happen during the full moon, please limit your catch as these are spawning concentrations. I have not heard of any large Yellowtail this week but there have been fish to 10 pounds caught, and they are becoming more common every week. It should not be long before we start to see larger fish on a consistent basis.

FISH RECIPE: Simple is the key work. This is about as simple as it gets. Take a Dorado fillet cut to meal size (or Snapper, or Wahoo), marinate it for about 30 minutes in fresh lemon juice. Dust it with salt and pepper, then again with some smoked Paprika (I have a big bottle of Penzy’s in the cupboard) and cook it in a frying pan with a couple of tablespoons of oil (I like using the Avocado Oil they have here at Cost-Co). Serve it up with some potatoes that have been diced small and dusted with Thyme and a bit of Paprika as well as with a small salad. Easy, tasty and good for you!

NOTES: I have forgotten to mention in my last two reports that the Whales are here! Grey Whales close to the beach and Humpback Whales farther out, both species have been putting on good shows for us on a daily basis. This weeks report was written to the music of “Two Tons Of Steel” on their CD “Not That Lucky”. A bit of Texas Rockabilly to keep my toes a tapping!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report for November 18 – 24, 2013

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING

Captain George Landrum

gmlandrum@hotmail.com

www.flyhooker.com

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/

Cabo Fish Report

Nov. 18 – 24, 2013

WEATHER: We have been under partly cloudy skies for most of the week and it has been rather nice! I know that everyone loves the sun, and while you can still get a tan while it’s cloudy, it’s just not the same. However, from a fisherman’s point of view, these partly cloudy skies help in several ways. Number one is less glare on the water, making it easier to see and find fish indicators such as bird piles, fin tips and tails and porpoise in the distance. Second is that without the direct sun, it is more comfortable on the water! Our daytime highs have been in the mid 80’s while nighttime lows have been in the mid to low 70’s, and, it’s been much less humid than it was last week!

WATER: With no storms in the area the swells died back down to what we expect this time of year, 3-5 feet on the Pacific side of the Cape and 1-3 feet on the Cortez side. At least in our area that is. If you travel far enough up the Cortez you eventually end up on the East Cape, and there the wind has kicked things up so that a bumpy ride is almost a guarantee. Locally the water temperatures have remained steady with water from the Arch on the Pacific side to Los Frailes being 81-82 degrees, and outside of 10 miles by Los Frailes being several degrees warmer. We have had a cool spot of water hovering right on top of the 95 spot all week long, it has been 76 degrees and slightly off color. On the Pacific side the water has been blue and 76 degrees with slightly warmer 78 degree water to the west side of the San Jaime Banks.

BAIT: Caballito, Tortilla Chips (baby Pompano), a few Mackerel and assorted other small fish have been the larger live baits available at the usual $3 per bait.

FISHING:

BILLFISH: Billfish action remained red hot this past week and you did not have to go far to get to the action as many boats fishing only half days, or anglers fishing on Pangas were able to find decent sized Striped Marlin close to home. With water temperatures at a perfect 76 degrees and blue, the area from the lighthouse to inside the Golden Gate Bank on the Pacific side of the Cape was a perfect area to focus efforts. At times I did hear complaints from anglers looking for meat fish that the Striped Marlin were getting in the way! Schools of baby Pompano, small Mackerel and Caballito close to the beach meant that the Striped Marlin were close as well. With the usual combat fishing we see this time of year, when every boat in the area races to be the first one on the scene, when the high flying Frigates suddenly appear, swooping down on escaping bait, it was exciting, although a bit nerve wracking. Fortunately the fish were thick enough that you did not need to compete in the “speed boat challenge”. Hanging around an area that everyone had just left was a perfect way to make sure you caught a fish with less competition. Slow trolling or drifting through an area everyone had just left gave you a great shot at fish, as the noise and commotion caused by so many boats in one spot drove the fish and the bait under surface. They came back up in a little while, so if you stuck it out you hooked up. The closer to the beach you were, the more likely you were to catch something on the little Pompanos, slightly farther off the beach the Caballito worked and if you were several miles out then Mackerel were the bait of choice. Fish were thick enough off of Los Arcos ridge, Golden Gate Bank and the lighthouse ledge that dropping live bait to 100 feet or more on the drift was a very productive technique. Please remember though, if you are using live bait and drifting like this, ask the crews to use circle hooks. This is less stressful on the Marlin and makes a safe release much easier. Also, please don’t remove the fish from the water for a picture before releasing it, the internal organs are normally supported by the bouyancy of the water, and the weight when removed can tear the connective tissue holding them in place. Many charters stress catch and release for Billfish. We do as well, but with the understanding that there will be a few fatalities to the fish, and if fishing in a big money tournament we may take one or two. I just hate to see pictures of people holding a Marlin out of the water, then bragging that they “release” all the fish their anglers catch. Maybe, but what condition are those fish in?

YELLOWFIN TUNA: Tuna are definitely the low spot of our present fishery, at least for the past week. A few fish are being caught at the high spots on the Gordo Banks, but you may end up putting in days of effort to get one, but its a pretty sure thing you will be feeding the sea lions. Farther up the line off of Punta Gorda there has been an occasional flurry of football sized Yellowfin on the high spots, but nothing I have heard of indicates consistent action. Even boats that have been traveling 40+ miles offshore have been having a bit of trouble finding Porpoise pods that have held fish. Those that have been able to fish pods that hold Yellowfin have done fairly decent using live bait dropped in front of the traveling schools and flying a kite over the advancing front of these pods of Porpoise. The usual lures pulled while trolling have not been nearly as successful, but when they have worked, they have been dark colored lures for the most part, dark purple or green hootchies, or medium sized 5” lures in dark colors. For some reason cedar plugs have not been very hot for the past week.

 

 

DORADO: I believe you could make a good case for either Striped Marlin or Dorado as being our “Fish of the Week” this past week, as they both have been found in the same areas and both of them have provided plenty of action. This week the Dorado action picked back up, with any angler that wanted to catch a limit finding it no problem at all, the only difficulty was holding off on the 10-12 pound fish until one of the 20 pound plus fish hooked up. Normally we would be working the Frigate birds for Dorado, but with the Striped Marlin being as thick as they have been the Frigates have been on them instead. The best way to ensure a good catch on Dorado was to troll a 5” to 7” lure at slightly higher speeds, often 10 knots or better, until hooking up a Dorado, then working the same are with slow trolled live bait. The only problem (and what a problem to have!) were the number of Striped Marlin that would come in and eat bait intended for Dorado. Many of the boats were working the area between the Arch and the desalinization plant on the Pacific side, and going no further than that to get limits on decent Dorado (legal limit is two Dorado per person).

WAHOO: There was no change in the Wahoo report for this week, it is a repeat of last weeks action as the occasional Wahoo continued to surprise anglers, and crews as well, as these toothy fish managed to snip many lures from leaders without anyone noticing! Boats that were using wire leader, or just happened to get hooked right, were bringing back fish averaging 30 pounds. There were not a lot of them, but enough to make each strike a possibility.

INSHORE: Small Roosterfish still dominate the beach fishery but there have been occasional schools of fish in the 15-18 pound class show up, to the enjoyment of the anglers! Combine these Roosterfish with some decent Red Snapper action in the rocks and if you did not want Marlin or Dorado you had options. Or maybe you were just tired of catching Striped Marlin and Dorado and wanted something different. While I do not recommend it for cruisers, Pangas were able to get right in tight to the rocks in order to sling out a small weight with live bait into the pockets among the rocks. There were many snags and break-offs, but there were also some very nice Snapper to be found as well. A few Sierra and a few Yellowtail continue to be caught, the numbers go up just a bit every week, and the size on both seems to be improving slightly.

FISH RECIPE: Seared Tuna with Sesame seeds: Just about as simple as you can make it (my favorite kind!) Recipe posted on the blog in a few minutes.

NOTES: Can you say “Red Hot”? I normally avoid using those words, but since I am not predicting, just reporting, I feel they are appropriate for this past weeks fishing action. Add in the unusual number of whales that are showing up early and it has been great to be on the water! We are approaching Thanksgiving, and we have many things to be thankful for this year. We hope to have 20-30 people over for dinner Thursday once again, and one of the things to be thankful for is the number of friends that we do have. It is time like these months past that you really come to appreciate who they are, and what they do for you. On that note I would like to wish all our U.S. Friends “Happy Thanksgiving”, and offer thanks to all our Canadian and Mexican friends for their continued support this year. This weeks report is written to the music of Roger Creagor on a mixed CD given to me by a good friend. Until next week, Tight Lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/Image

Cabo Fish Report

FLY HOOKER SPORTFISHING
Captain George Landrum
gmlandrum@hotmail.com
http://www.flyhooker.com
https://captgeo.wordpress.com/
Cabo Fish Report
January 7 – 13, 2013
WEATHER: It feels as if we are getting into our winter season as the morning lows have been in the high 50’s and the daytime highs in the high 70’s. I don’t think I saw the temperature raise to 80 degrees this week. This is great if you have been dealing with below freezing weather at home, but cold for us who live here. We did have some wind from the north again this week and it kept things cool, combine that with cloud cover for about half the week and it feels like the season has changed.
WATER: At the end of this week there was not much change from the end of last week as far as the surface temperatures went. The cold green water we had seen to east of a line across the Gordo Banks and the area south had moved to the east, allowing cleaner, slightly warmer water on the Gordo Bank and across the flats just to the east of Punta Gorda. To the west of that area the water inshore of the 1,000 fathom line remained in the 72 degree range, and south of the 1,000 fathom line it warmed to 75 degrees. On the Pacific and across the Cape region to the south the water averaged 74 degrees. Due to the northerly wind the water on the Pacific side and offshore on the Sea of Cortez side remained a bit choppy and had a lump of 2-5 foot swells, spaced far enough apart that it was not strongly felt. On the Cortez side the swells were smaller, as is usual, at 1-3 feet.
BAIT: Caballito, Mackerel and frozen Ballyhoo could be had for $3 each this week, and there were very few Sardinas available.
FISHING:
BILLFISH: The Striped Marlin bite slowed down just a bit this week, perhaps due to the new moon phase, there has to be some reason. Instead of almost every boat getting one or two, sometimes four releases, we were lucky to get that many hook-ups, and get a release for the day. The fish are still there, we are seeing them tailing on the surface, they just were showing little interest in bait or lures this week. This is sure to change as the moon phase changes, it always does. The good point is that the fish are still here! Most of the fish were found on the Pacific side from the Golden Gate to the San Jaime and inside that line, in the canyon. Not as many this week were found inside the two mile line, more were found just outside there. Not to say there were no fish caught, contrary, there were plenty of fish caught and released, and unfortunately quite a few brought in to the dock, just not as many as were caught last week. My guess is that approximately 60% of the boats caught a billfish this week.
YELLOWFIN TUNA: The tuna pen that came though our area last week is gone, but the word is that there are several more that will be approaching soon. Hopefully they will be holding as many fish as the one that just passed. Meanwhile, there have been Yellowfin found outside and to the south of the San Jaime Bank, it was just a bit of a bumpy trip to get to them. The porpoise were holding Tuna so the trick was to find the porpoise and hope you were there at the right time. The tuna were footballs for the most part, but one of the schools was of fish between 25 and 45 pounds, and I did hear of an 80 pound class fish caught as well. The larger fish were biting on live bait drifted way back behind the boat, and the usual dark colored lures and cedar plugs accounted for the rest.

DORADO: As the water continues to cool the bite continues to slow, but there are enough Dorado around to still be the offshore fish of the week. Not as many anglers limited out this week as did last week, but the fish were still in the same areas and feeding the same. The week before last the fish count on Dorado really spiked due to the tuna pen coming by, this past week we returned to more normal conditions. I know I heard a charter broker telling potential clients that the Dorado fishing was off-the-chart good several days after the tuna pen was gone, hope they were not too disappointed! Meanwhile, fishing within two miles of the beach on the Pacific side resulted in the majority of the Dorado found, and these cool water fish were a bit larger, and keep getting larger, every week. My guess is that the average this week was 15 pounds, and there were probably about a quarter of the boats getting limits and the rest about one fish per angler, that was for the boats that were targeting the Dorado. As normal, keeping the first fish in the water to attract more worked well, as did slow trolling a live bait under feeding Frigate birds.
WAHOO: New moon but cool water, what more need I say? Wahoo really prefer slightly warmer water than we are experiencing right now, but there were still a few caught this past week locally. Most of the fish were small, in the 10-15 pound range, and there were not many of them, but you still had a chance. This just might have been the last week to get one of these speedsters hooked up until the water warms back up. The fish that were caught were found inside the 300 foot depth contour, and were caught by boats that targeted them using Rapallas and Marauders on wire leader. There were more fish cut off on mono-filament leader used on lures run for Dorado than were caught.
INSHORE: As I said on my mid-week up-date, the Sierra bite went wide open during the middle of the week with boats getting into the fish from the lighthouse all the way up the Pacific coast to Migraino. Bright colored hootchies worked great, and I had a client who fly-fished for two days with a guide who got tired of catching them after a fish count that went over 50! They went through many flies during the two days, starting with fully dressed ones and finally putting on new ones when all that was left was just a bit of dressing on the hook. Tired arms, a fish on every cast and the fish ranged from 3 pounds to 8 pounds, it doesn’t get any better than that! As well as the Sierra, there have been some Amberjack, Grouper and a few Snapper being found. As far as Yellowtail are concerned, the commercial panga anglers working at night are getting a few, but there have been no real numbers found during the daytime. We are still seeing a few scattered small Roosterfish as well.
FISH RECIPE: Check the blog for this months recipe!
NOTES: There are plenty of whales to be seen when the fishing slows down so even if you are not a hard-core angler you deserve to get out on the water for that show. And of course since there are fish biting, catch dinner as well! I thought I’d mention something about myself today. I am actually a Captain and don’t just call myself a Captain, or Commander, or Admiral. I hold a 100 Ton U.S.C.G. License and am I.G.F.A. Certified, and am a Captain on a private boat. I have 10 ½ years in the U.S. Navy, 6 years experience commercial fishing in the tropics and extensive experience in wholesale/retail seafood. My Charter experience started after commercial fishing became hard on my body and I have been working charter and private boats for 18 years, and have been in Cabo, working on boats and chartering boats for 13 years. We have a business license, pay taxes and work out of the house since shop space is so expensive here. My reports have been going out every week (with a few weeks missed due to hurricanes) for 12 years, un-biased and honest, I don’t try to lay it on thick in order to get you here, just try to give you information to help you make fishing decisions. I appreciate all the e-mails I get from you as readers and plan on continuing the reports as long as possible! This weeks report was written to the music of James Taylor and his “Best of” CD. Until next week, tight lines!

And as always, George writes this report

and posts to the blog on Sunday morning. So if you

can’t wait, click the “FOLLOW” on the top of the blog

page! You will know whenever something new is posted!

https://captgeo.wordpress.com/